anonymous
  • anonymous
help! Anita made a wax model of a rolling pin of diameter 6 cm. The rolling pin was shaped like a right circular cylinder with a right circular cone at each end as shown below. A rolling pin shaped as a cylinder with conical ends. The length of the cylindrical part is 9 cm, the slant height of each cone is 4 cm and the diameter of the rolling pin is 6 cm. http://learn.flvs.net/webdav/assessment_images/educator_geometry_v14/pool_Geom_3641_0810_19/image0014e68d166.jpg What was the total surface area of the rolling pin? write out steps please
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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jdoe0001
  • jdoe0001
url requires login, try with a screenshot instead
anonymous
  • anonymous
surface area of the cylinder (without its bases) : 2*pi*r*h surface area of each of the cones (without base) : pi*r*s (s=slant height) can you do it now ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
here it is

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anonymous
  • anonymous
@jdoe0001
anonymous
  • anonymous
it is ok.. look at what i wrote .. the text was informative we dont really need the picture
anonymous
  • anonymous
so the surface area of the cylinder would be 169.56 and the surface area of the cone is 37.68 but now what do i do to find the total surface area to i add them together?
anonymous
  • anonymous
well first notice that we ignore the bases since the base of each cones touches a different base of the cylinder
anonymous
  • anonymous
now, we have 1 cylinder and 2 cones .. so what we should do ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
ummm would you subtract the base from each one?
anonymous
  • anonymous
now as you can see the formulas that i wrote are formulas for surface areas WITHOUT bases
anonymous
  • anonymous
so no worries about the bases anymore. i just wanted to point it out
anonymous
  • anonymous
you wrote "so the surface area of the cylinder would be 169.56 and the surface area of the cone is 37.68 but now what do i do to find the total surface area to i add them together?" now we have surface area of the cylinder (without bases) : 169.56 and surface area of one cone (without base) : 37.68 we have 1 cylinder and 2 cones .. what we should do then ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
add them together
anonymous
  • anonymous
169.56 + 37.68 ? what about the second cone ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
add 37.68 to it again
anonymous
  • anonymous
correct
anonymous
  • anonymous
to make it 169.56+37.68+37.68= 244.92?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
now just one moment.. what if you had only one cone ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1378674521860:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
then it would be 207.24
anonymous
  • anonymous
no, since we need to add one base (you see the left base is part of the surface now!)
anonymous
  • anonymous
when we had two cones, no one of the bases (nor the cylinder and not the cones) were part of the surface of the shape now, we have one base that is part of the surface of the shape
anonymous
  • anonymous
sorry for my English by the way
anonymous
  • anonymous
so would you add 6 to it because that is the diameter of it?
anonymous
  • anonymous
no, the area of one base of the cylinder (which is in fact area of a circle ) = pi*r^2
anonymous
  • anonymous
so would you add 28.26 to it?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1378675109050:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
think about the rectangle as "unfolding" the cylinder body
anonymous
  • anonymous
i dont want to confuse you but my last draw was supposed to help you understand why the surface area of the cylinder is what it is
anonymous
  • anonymous
anyway , @shelbyryne i have to go now. hope i helped :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thank you VERY much you helped soooo much!!!

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