anonymous
  • anonymous
Choose the answer that shows the proper --definition of acceleration. -- How far an object travels in a given time interval, including direction. -- How far an object travels in a given time interval, regardless of direction. -- How much the velocity of an object changes in a given time interval and what direction it is in. -- The change in position of the object with respect to the starting point. -- How much the velocity of an object changes in a given time interval, regardless of direction.
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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theEric
  • theEric
What are your initial thoughts, on this one?
anonymous
  • anonymous
well i looked in the book and this is tricky lol ..I think it could be 1 or 3 I really have no idea
theEric
  • theEric
Well, this might be asking too much, but can you try to explain what acceleration is in your own words?

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anonymous
  • anonymous
its how far something goes in a certain amount of time but the book also states something about it being a vector as well
theEric
  • theEric
It is actually how the velocity changes in a certain amount of time! That might clear up some of your confusion!
anonymous
  • anonymous
"How much the velocity of an object changes in a given time interval and what direction it is in" is certainly true.
theEric
  • theEric
And yes, acceleration is a vector - meaning it has both a magnitude and a direction! When you have a vector, direction is important!
anonymous
  • anonymous
so would the correct answer be this..How much the velocity of an object changes in a given time interval and what direction it is in. the 3rd one.. bc it states the velocity changing in the amount of time and bc its also a vector (meaning direction)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Dividing a quantity which is a vector by a scalar says nothing in general. consider, for ex, the pressure exerted to a body. It is nonsense to relate to the pressure a direction but it does mean in the case of the acceleration.
theEric
  • theEric
Exactly!
theEric
  • theEric
That is the definition of average acceleration, at least!
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay so it has nothing to do with how far
anonymous
  • anonymous
No. the definition is still stable even if the time difference is considerably small....
theEric
  • theEric
Nope, not at all, @pretty27 ! An object can go on forever with no acceleration if it has a velocity!
anonymous
  • anonymous
wait a second that just confused me can you make that clearer please?
anonymous
  • anonymous
so if it has a velocity but the acceleration stays the same it can go on forever but the distance has nothing to do with acceleration ?
theEric
  • theEric
I guess I was confusing... The change in distance per time doesn't tell you what the acceleration is.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ohh acceleration is just velocity changing over time and with direction (vector)
theEric
  • theEric
For any object, it's motion depends on things like velocity and acceleration if it has them. But you can't tell what the acceleration is just by the change in distance per time!
theEric
  • theEric
Right! When you think acceleration, you think velocity change per time change! That is correct!
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay thank you so much!
theEric
  • theEric
Now, velocity has direction, so acceleration will also. Like with a falling rock. First the velocity is \(0\), then maybe \(19.6\) meters per second after \(2\) seconds. The change from \(0\) to \(-19.6\) is \(-19.6\) meters per second, and the change in time is \(2\) seconds. So the change in velocity divided by the change in time is \(\dfrac{19.6\ [m/s]}{2\ [s]}=9.8\ [m/s^2]\). I chose my numbers to make the rock fall with just gravity! :)
theEric
  • theEric
Ah! Wait...
theEric
  • theEric
\(\dfrac{-19.6\ [m/s]}{2\ [s]}=-9.8\ [m/s^2]\)
theEric
  • theEric
I forgot the negatives, which was the whole point! You see that acceleration has direction, then! :) Just a small example. I guess that was the last one. Take care! :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
thank you so much for your hepl..see you soon, hopefully you will be on later this week
anonymous
  • anonymous
help*
theEric
  • theEric
Haha, I like to get on a couple times a week if possible! :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay thank you and talk to you soon more about physics! =D
theEric
  • theEric
Cool! Sounds fun :) Take care until then.

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