anonymous
  • anonymous
I am currently in a course designed to help math students in writing proof. This course is introducing me to logic formulas and does not give a very detailed explanation on what is and is not allowed in logic formulas as such I would like assistance in identifying if each of these are "well-formed" formulas
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
So what are you asking?
anonymous
  • anonymous
what is the question, whatisthequestion?
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1378771923630:dw|

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anonymous
  • anonymous
more to come
anonymous
  • anonymous
for this one I know the number of "not"s is clunky but I'm not sure if it disobeys any rules
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1378772011281:dw| I'm almost certain this one is not well formed
anonymous
  • anonymous
That isn't proper notation.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Are you in a college proofs class? Because if you are, they are not teaching you the proper way to write these logic statements.
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1378772076743:dw| well, the point of this question is for me to figure out if the questions are proper or not, and to give a reason if they are. I am in a university class and are copying these from my textbook.
anonymous
  • anonymous
are you talking about the commas? cause I think that is what makes that one improper
anonymous
  • anonymous
They are close. The one with commas, however, is incorrect.
anonymous
  • anonymous
The negation signs in front of the letters are correct, but the commas have no definite meaning. You must use the and sign, and or sign. (U and upside down U).
anonymous
  • anonymous
yup cause there needs to be a symbol for "and" or "or" between them. Yeah like I said I thought those were improper. Some of these are intended to have no meaning. I am suppose to pick out which ones are written improperly,,,that was probably the most obvious one
anonymous
  • anonymous
Do you know if you are allowed to have the back to back "not"s like in the first question?
anonymous
  • anonymous
You can, but it's redundant and inefficient. It serves no purpose other than to mess with your mind! :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thus why that one was throwing me for a loop.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yea, just like in plain English, a double negative in mathematical logic means a positive. At least when it comes to logic proofs.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thank you for the clarification. My textbook was confusing the crap out of me
anonymous
  • anonymous
It's a confusing subject, but once you get the hang of it, it will get fun when dealing with functions, and countability!

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