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toxicsugar22

  • one year ago

what is plainchant

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  1. AccidentalAiChan
    • one year ago
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plainsong

  2. AccidentalAiChan
    • one year ago
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    Plainsong (also plainchant; Latin: cantus planus) is a body of chants used in the liturgies of the Western Church. Though the Eastern Orthodox churches and the Western Church did not split until long after the origin of plainsong, Byzantine chants are generally not classified as plainsong.

  3. toxicsugar22
    • one year ago
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    name one stringed instument and one wild insrment form ancient greece

  4. AccidentalAiChan
    • one year ago
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    Stringed: lyre Wild: aulos

  5. toxicsugar22
    • one year ago
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    thamsk

  6. toxicsugar22
    • one year ago
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    Why is Pythagoras important in ancient music?

  7. toxicsugar22
    • one year ago
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    do you know

  8. toxicsugar22
    • one year ago
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    what is organum

  9. AccidentalAiChan
    • one year ago
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    Organum (/ˈɔrɡənəm/; Greek: ὄργανον, organon "organ, instrument, tool")[1] is, in general, a plainchant melody with at least one added voice to enhance the harmony, developed in the Middle Ages. Depending on the mode and form of the chant, a supporting bass line (or bourdon[disambiguation needed]) may be sung on the same text, the melody may be followed in parallel motion (parallel organum), or a combination of both of these techniques may be employed. As no real independent second voice exists, this is a form of heterophony. In its earliest stages, organum involved two musical voices: a Gregorian chant melody, and the same melody transposed by a consonant interval, usually a perfect fifth or fourth. In these cases the composition often began and ended on a unison, the added voice keeping to the initial tone until the first part has reached a fifth or fourth, from where both voices proceeded in parallel harmony, with the reverse process at the end. Organum was originally improvised; while one singer performed a notated melody (the vox principalis), another singer—singing "by ear"—provided the unnotated second melody (the vox organalis). Over time, composers began to write added parts that were not just simple transpositions, thus creating true polyphony.

  10. toxicsugar22
    • one year ago
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    Name two medieval musical instruments that are no longer commen in today's music

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