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mikaa_toxica13

  • 2 years ago

tell whether each percent change is an increase or decrease. Then find the percent change. Round to the nearest percent. original amount: 45 new amount: 60

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  1. AravindG
    • 2 years ago
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    What do you think about this question? Any ideas?

  2. mikaa_toxica13
    • 2 years ago
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    None. My teacher hasn't taught me this yet. I know it's an increase though.

  3. Hero
    • 2 years ago
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    \[\%\Delta = \frac{|a - b|}{a} \times 100\] \(\%\Delta = \) Percent Change \(a = \) Old Amount \(b = \) New amount

  4. mikaa_toxica13
    • 2 years ago
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    Ook Can u use the actual numbers in that ?

  5. Hero
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes, that's what you're supposed to do. In this case: \(a = 45\) \(b = 60\)

  6. mikaa_toxica13
    • 2 years ago
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    Thank u. It's hard for me to understand this stuff. ok so it would be x = 45−60 ==== ×100 45 45 - 60 = -15 15 == = 3 45 3(100) = 300

  7. Hero
    • 2 years ago
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    \[\frac{15}{45} = \frac{1}{3}\]

  8. mikaa_toxica13
    • 2 years ago
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    ok so 1/3(100) = 33

  9. Hero
    • 2 years ago
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    Correct.

  10. mikaa_toxica13
    • 2 years ago
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    Thank u !

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