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UnkleRhaukus Group Title

Tension in a rope

  • 11 months ago
  • 11 months ago

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  1. UnkleRhaukus Group Title
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    |dw:1380875877019:dw|

    • 11 months ago
  2. UnkleRhaukus Group Title
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    |dw:1380875928995:dw|

    • 11 months ago
  3. UnkleRhaukus Group Title
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    |dw:1380876030469:dw|

    • 11 months ago
  4. UnkleRhaukus Group Title
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    is my diagram right?

    • 11 months ago
  5. ganeshie8 Group Title
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    sag in rope due to mass of rope ?

    • 11 months ago
  6. UnkleRhaukus Group Title
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    yes

    • 11 months ago
  7. ganeshie8 Group Title
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    then u wud take 'mg = 2T cos(theta)' is it im not sure how the entire mass of rope gets manifested at center ?

    • 11 months ago
  8. UnkleRhaukus Group Title
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    that's the tension at the end of the rope , but i'm looking for the tension in the middle

    • 11 months ago
  9. ganeshie8 Group Title
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    oh tension can be different thru out the rope in this system ?

    • 11 months ago
  10. ganeshie8 Group Title
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    since the rope has mass... things may not be ideal hmm

    • 11 months ago
  11. wio Group Title
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    |dw:1380882967712:dw|

    • 10 months ago
  12. Kainui Group Title
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    Is this a rope of uniform density?

    • 10 months ago
  13. Kainui Group Title
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    Is it in a vaccuum with a neutral charge?

    • 10 months ago
  14. UnkleRhaukus Group Title
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    yes the rope is uniform density , and has a total mass of m

    • 10 months ago
  15. wio Group Title
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    Tension at the middle? Where is the middle?

    • 10 months ago
  16. UnkleRhaukus Group Title
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    yes i think we can make these assumptions

    • 10 months ago
  17. UnkleRhaukus Group Title
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    yeah in the middle of the symmetric rope

    • 10 months ago
  18. wio Group Title
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    It would depend on the length between tethers and the length of the rope.

    • 10 months ago
  19. Kainui Group Title
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    So if we're leaving this general, it's just based on the angle, which doesn't really matter to us though.

    • 10 months ago
  20. UnkleRhaukus Group Title
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    |dw:1380883258783:dw|

    • 10 months ago
  21. Kainui Group Title
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    Unless they're telling us the length of the rope and the length of the distance it's stretched across, then we're screwed.

    • 10 months ago
  22. UnkleRhaukus Group Title
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    the tensions should be a function of (m,θ,g)

    • 10 months ago
  23. Kainui Group Title
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    So the rope's not moving right? That means the forces up and forces down should be equal, right? So... mg=2Tcos(theta) Solve for T, problem solved.

    • 10 months ago
  24. wio Group Title
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    That's assuming all the mass is in the center?

    • 10 months ago
  25. wio Group Title
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    |dw:1380883547495:dw|

    • 10 months ago
  26. wio Group Title
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    |dw:1380883559040:dw|

    • 10 months ago
  27. Kainui Group Title
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    Since it has a uniform density, center of mass is there, so it's safe assumption.

    • 10 months ago
  28. wio Group Title
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    |dw:1380883578211:dw|

    • 10 months ago
  29. Kainui Group Title
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    |dw:1380883594219:dw|

    • 10 months ago