Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

deepthiakella1 Group Title

identify the open intervals on which the function is increasing or decreasing-- f(x)=(x+3)^3

  • 10 months ago
  • 10 months ago

  • This Question is Closed
  1. tkhunny Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Do we get to use the derivative?

    • 10 months ago
  2. deepthiakella1 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yup!

    • 10 months ago
  3. tkhunny Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    All-righty, then. Show us f'(x).

    • 10 months ago
  4. deepthiakella1 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    3(x+1)^2

    • 10 months ago
  5. shamil98 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the derivative is 3(x+3)^2

    • 10 months ago
  6. tkhunny Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Perfect. If you think of the right thing, the answer to the following question is really, REALLY easy. :-) Where is f'(x) negative, given that \(f'(x) = 2(x+3)^{2}\)?

    • 10 months ago
  7. deepthiakella1 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    wait did i get the derivative wrong

    • 10 months ago
  8. tkhunny Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No, you got it. I just had a typo-spasm. The answer to my question is the same. When is f'(x) negative? Don't look at the graph. Just think on the structure. A Real Number squared. When is that negative?

    • 10 months ago
  9. shamil98 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I got a question, why is 3(x+3)^2 not the derivative? o.o

    • 10 months ago
  10. deepthiakella1 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Isnt it using the chain rule...maybe haha

    • 10 months ago
  11. tkhunny Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ?? Why as that? You have it. Don't let my typo confuse you. \(f(x) = (x+3)^{3}\) \(f'(x) = 3(x+3)^{2}\) Okay, now answer... When is f'(x) negative?

    • 10 months ago
  12. deepthiakella1 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so actually my question was f(x)=(x+1)^3 but thats okay haha but im not sure it can be negative

    • 10 months ago
  13. deepthiakella1 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    idk

    • 10 months ago
  14. shamil98 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh then the derivative is 3(x+1)^2

    • 10 months ago
  15. deepthiakella1 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hahaha ya

    • 10 months ago
  16. tkhunny Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Come on. You can see it. If you start with a Real Number, and Square it, will you EVER get a negative number? The derivative is NOT \(3(x+1)^{2}\). The derivative is \(f'(x) = 3(x+1)^{2}\). Don't be afraid to write whole, complete expressions.

    • 10 months ago
  17. deepthiakella1 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no

    • 10 months ago
  18. shamil98 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    sorry, f'(x) = 3(x+1)^2 continue with your explanation :P

    • 10 months ago
  19. tkhunny Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Can f'(x) EVER be zero (0)?

    • 10 months ago
  20. deepthiakella1 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    if x was -1 right?

    • 10 months ago
  21. deepthiakella1 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    haha im stupid at calc. sorry :(

    • 10 months ago
  22. deepthiakella1 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    tkhunny where did you go????

    • 10 months ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.