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praxer

  • one year ago

If an electric dipole is placed along the X axis and we measure the potential at a point in the negative X axis then why does the sum of the potential not becomes zero.

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  1. praxer
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1381951889730:dw|

  2. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    I'm not sure. But Isn't this refering to superposition principle? You have more of a pull on A.

  3. praxer
    • one year ago
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  4. praxer
    • one year ago
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    In the attachment there is a example and in the solution it is given that there is no possibility of potentials due to two charges to adding upto zero for x<0

  5. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    I think for this you should be using \(\sf \color{}{F = 2aqr_0}\) ? Right? In terms of el. dipole.

  6. praxer
    • one year ago
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    hmmm, but when it comes for potential it is pk/r^2 in an axial dipole

  7. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    Isn't that torque??

  8. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    Sorry I forgot all my phsycs I took E&M like 4 years ago. And I have no books to help me. lol

  9. praxer
    • one year ago
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    But the question said about potential, so i think we should not bring about electric field. Because in the solution it was given that on the negative axis there is no possibility of the potential to become Zero.

  10. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    Maybe @zepdrix can help.

  11. Study23
    • one year ago
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    I don't have much experience with this topic in physics... I just started physics recently (on vectors displacement and the like...) Sorry, @praxer! Maybe you could help me out?

  12. praxer
    • one year ago
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    @e.mccormick can u hlp me undrstnd this..

  13. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    I'm sure @Luigi0210 can help.

  14. praxer
    • one year ago
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    @abb0t no one did help :(

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