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tigersprite

  • 2 years ago

On the basis of bonding, which of the following is true about potassium chloride when compared to sucrose? (Points : 3) Potassium chloride has a higher boiling point than sucrose. Potassium chloride dissolves in water, but sucrose does not. Potassium chloride has a lower melting point than sucrose. Potassium chloride crystals are softer than sucrose crystals.

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  1. Someguyfromcrowd
    • 2 years ago
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    Potassium chloride, KCl, is an ionic compound. This means that it has strong dipole interactions with its neighbors. Sucrose is a covalent compound with some hydrogen bonding. It sticks to its neighbors pretty well, but isn't nearly as strong as an ionic compound. Since ionic compounds are more strongly bound to one another than covalent compounds are, they tend to melt/evaporate at higher temperatures. Solubility is based off of whether or not the compound interacts with water (both of these do- KCl is highly polar, whilst sucrose allows for hydrogen bonding with water). Softness is a bit hard to predict- both of these molecules form tough crystals, though, so you can probably ignore that. You should be able to answer the question with what I've gone through so far, but do let me know if you need further explanation of anything!

  2. tigersprite
    • 2 years ago
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    I'm guessing it's option A, because if Potassium cholride is an ionic compound, this means that it is stronger than a simple covalent one. That also means it is tougher, and would require more energy to be boiled. Is that correct?

  3. Someguyfromcrowd
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes, that's right. The attraction between the different atoms' charges causes the ionic compound to hold together very tightly. Covalent compounds have to make do with weaker dipoles, hydrogen bonding, and London dispersion forces.

  4. tigersprite
    • 2 years ago
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    Thank you, that makes much more sense now!! :)

  5. Someguyfromcrowd
    • 2 years ago
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    You're welcome! Do let me know if you have any other questions.

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