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mathsmarts

  • 2 years ago

a square is inscribed in a circle, each side of sq measures 4^2 in. Find an expression for the exact area of the shaded region... That being outside the square within the circle...I know how to get the shaded area.. I need the expression which is (16 pi - 32) but I dont understand the answer. can you help with that???

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  1. Decart
    • 2 years ago
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    area of circle - area of square

  2. mathsmarts
    • 2 years ago
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    I know how to get the shaded area.. I need the expression which is (16 pi - 32) but I dont understand the answer. can you help with that???

  3. DemolisionWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    is this correct? |dw:1385249213040:dw|

  4. mathsmarts
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1385250369163:dw|

  5. AllTehMaffs
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1385250006166:dw| The area of the shaded region of the problem you described is \[A= 128 \pi - 256\]

  6. AllTehMaffs
    • 2 years ago
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    ah, in that case

  7. AllTehMaffs
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1385250495005:dw|

  8. AllTehMaffs
    • 2 years ago
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    on the right, it should say \[r=c/2\]

  9. jdoe0001
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1385251179646:dw|

  10. mathsmarts
    • 2 years ago
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    YOU GUYS ARE AWESOME!!!

  11. mathsmarts
    • 2 years ago
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    how do I give you a metal?

  12. AllTehMaffs
    • 2 years ago
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    To understand the answer, we can look at another example. Say we have two rectangles, one that's 8x5 and another 2x5 - the smaller one is inset in the other. |dw:1385273283416:dw|

  13. AllTehMaffs
    • 2 years ago
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    If we want to find the area of the "shaded region" (like in the circle problem) |dw:1385273501118:dw| we can subtract the area of the little rectangle from the bigger rectangle \[8*5-2*5 = 40-10=30\] In this instance, it's easy to see that the shaded area is the larger area minus the smaller area - we check it knowing that the rectangular shaded region has dimensions 6x5 |dw:1385273671303:dw| \[6x5=30\] So the area of the shaded rectangle is proved to be equivalent to the area of the large rectangle minus the area of the small rectangle \[6*5 = 8*5-2*5\] \[30=40-10\] \[30=30 \ \Huge \color{green} \checkmark\] Similarly, the answer in the back of the book gives the area of the larger circle |dw:1385273946213:dw| minus the area of the inscribed square |dw:1385274015235:dw| And the radius of the circle was found using the Pythagorean Thm. to find the diameter of the circle (and thus the radius) |dw:1385274176101:dw|

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