Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

DUDE..IM..A..DUCK

  • 2 years ago

what is the derivative of pi^2.

  • This Question is Closed
  1. hartnn
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    pi^2 is constant derivative of constant = 0

  2. DUDE..IM..A..DUCK
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    alright thanks , the answer was 2pi thanks man :D

  3. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The answer was 2pi?

  4. DUDE..IM..A..DUCK
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    yep

  5. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Is pi here a variable? Or is it pi, the constant?

  6. RolyPoly
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    If you define i as variable, p as constant, and you are differentiating with respect to the variable i.

  7. RolyPoly
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    In this case, you should specify all these in your question.

  8. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Is the question \(\pi ^2 \) or \(pi^2\)?

  9. DUDE..IM..A..DUCK
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    both

  10. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Huh?

  11. DUDE..IM..A..DUCK
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    constant

  12. hartnn
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    pi is constant. so we can't even differentiate w.r.t pi

  13. RolyPoly
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Troll -_-

  14. DUDE..IM..A..DUCK
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    ^

  15. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    OK, then the answer is zero.

  16. hartnn
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    ok, tell me atleast one thing, what are you differentiating with respect to ??

  17. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \(\pi \) can be used with any context. It's hard to trust today's teachers :P

  18. DUDE..IM..A..DUCK
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    i would agree

  19. DUDE..IM..A..DUCK
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    first she said 2pi

  20. DUDE..IM..A..DUCK
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    so i was like k 2pi

  21. ganeshie8
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    seen this discussion on his another account before, he is just trolling ;)

  22. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Who said 2pi?

  23. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Aww man.

  24. sophisticated.CHIMP
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah i just checked it's 2pi

  25. sophisticated.CHIMP
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    at least im sure it is

  26. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy