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StClowers

  • 2 years ago

If we find that there is a linear correlation between the concentration of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere and the global temperature, does that indicate that changes in the concentration of carbon dioxide cause changes in the global temperature? a. No. The presence of a linear correlation between two variables does not imply that one of the variables is the cause of the other variables. b. Yes. The presence of a linear correlation between two variables implies that one of the variables is the cause of the other variables.

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  1. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
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    Apply yourself.

  2. StClowers
    • 2 years ago
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    well i have tried and if i knew the answer, i would not post on here @ParthKohli

  3. StClowers
    • 2 years ago
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    I think the answer is YES...but not sure....can someone PLEASE help!!

  4. douglaswinslowcooper
    • 2 years ago
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    Locations of sources of milk and eggs are highly correlated, but cows don't give eggs nor do hens give milk. "Correlation does not demonstrate causation."

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