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Shajee45610

  • 2 years ago

how do you integrate (1-x)/x^2 +1 ?

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  1. eliotargy
    • 2 years ago
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    Just do \[\int\limits x ^{-2} + x^{-1} +1\] That simple

  2. ajdad00
    • 2 years ago
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    is that (1-x)/(x^2+1) or (1-x)/x^2 + 1 ? for the first I would break it up into 1/(x^2+1) and -x/(x^2+1) and integrate, the first term: arctan(x) the second: -.5ln(x^2+1) from integral tables. for the second, put into the form eliotargy has above and integrate to -(1/x)-ln(x)+x. dont forget the constant of integration

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