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genson0

  • 2 years ago

More trig/ Precal help

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  1. genson0
    • 2 years ago
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    Use an Addition or Subtraction Formula to find the exact value of the expression, as demonstrated in Example 1. \[\tan(\frac{ -17\pi }{ 12 })\]

  2. lahernan
    • 2 years ago
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    I think they may be referring to a trig identity like tan (s-t)=tan s - tan t/1 + tan s tan t?

  3. genson0
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes it does refer to those identities. I can do that part of the problem, but what I don't really understand is how do you get to the point of for example: \[\tan\frac{ \pi }{ 4} + \tan \frac{ \pi }{ 3 }\] or something like that

  4. genson0
    • 2 years ago
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    They're supposed to be grouped I meant, tan ( pi/4 + pi/3 )

  5. myininaya
    • 2 years ago
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    \[\tan(\frac{-17 \pi}{12})=\tan(\frac{-17 \pi}{12}+2 \pi)=\tan(\frac{-17 \pi +24 \pi}{12})=\tan(\frac{7 \pi }{12})\] \[\tan(\frac{\pi}{3}+\frac{\pi}{4})\]

  6. genson0
    • 2 years ago
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    oh okay thank you so much

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