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kylewendt

  • 2 years ago

What is the graph to 2x^2=8? I know this is a standard parabola, but what do you do with the 8?

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  1. dg98
    • 2 years ago
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    are you sure it's a graph? shouldn't it always be equal to y or f(x)?

  2. kylewendt
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes, it is a graph. If you need me to, I can copy the exact question (Which isn't much different)

  3. AccessDenied
    • 2 years ago
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    If we graph y = 2x^2 and y = 8 individually, their intersection is the graph for that equation; That said, 2x^2 is indeed a parabola with a bit of vertical stretch. The 8 is a constant. Consider it as a class of points where the y-value is 8: (x, 8) We can put any x-value in and get a point on this line, so the line is just a horizontal line through (0, 8)

  4. AccessDenied
    • 2 years ago
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    Or alternatively, I think you could bring that 8 over to the left: 2x^2 - 8 = 0 and draw that graph, which is the same parabola but shifted downwards by 8 units. The intersection at y=0 is the solution set in that case.

  5. kylewendt
    • 2 years ago
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    So, with 2 solutions, -2 and 2, would this be the graph?

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  6. AccessDenied
    • 2 years ago
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    That parabola seems to be flipped upside-down, implying it has a negative leading coefficient and positive vertical shift upwards. This parabola given by the equation has to be facing up because its leading term is +2. The whole graph will be shifted down 8 units.

  7. kylewendt
    • 2 years ago
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    Okay, thank you. I see my problem now!

  8. AccessDenied
    • 2 years ago
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    Great! I'm glad to help! :)

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