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dragonknight326 Group Title

8 questons medal and follow

  • 3 months ago
  • 3 months ago

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  1. dragonknight326 Group Title
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    Medals 1

    Question 2 (Multiple Choice Worth 4 points) (MC) Read Shedding Light on a Dark Day, by Robin Meriwether. The paragraphs have been numbered to help you identify them more easily. Shedding Light on a Dark Day, by Robin Meriwether On May 19, 1780, the skies over New England turned dark in the middle of the day. For more than two hundred years, New England's Dark Day had been shrouded in mystery. Some blamed volcanoes. Some suggested supernatural events. Some claimed it was a sign from the heavens. No one knew for certain what happened. Many thought the mystery would never be solved. Researchers at the University of Missouri were fascinated by the case. They began examining trees in all surrounding areas. Fire damage in a Canadian forest finally revealed the truth. Scientists looked at burned tree rings and discovered that huge wildfires once raged in the mountains near Ontario. The savage flames created blankets of black smoke. The smoke traveled high into the atmosphere, darkening the New England skies hundreds of miles away. What is the central idea of this article? No one knew why there was a really dark day in New England. On May 19, 1780, the skies over New England turned dark in the middle of the day. For more than two hundred years, New England's Dark Day had been shrouded in mystery. Researchers at the University of Missouri were fascinated by the case. The mystery lasted for over two hundred years. For over two hundred years, the reason for New England's Dark Day was unknown. Finally, researchers from the University of Missouri discovered that wildfire smoke from Canada rose up to the atmosphere, traveled hundreds of miles, and blotted out the sunlight over New England. Question 3 (Multiple Choice Worth 4 points) (MC) The next question refers to Shedding Light on a Dark Day, by Robin Meriwether. The paragraphs have been numbered to help you identify them more easily. Shedding Light on a Dark Day, by Robin Meriwether On May 19, 1780, the skies over New England turned dark in the middle of the day. For more than two hundred years, New England's Dark Day had been shrouded in mystery. Some blamed volcanoes. Some suggested supernatural events. Some claimed it was a sign from the heavens. No one knew for certain what happened. Many thought the mystery would never be solved. Researchers at the University of Missouri were fascinated by the case. They began examining trees in all surrounding areas. Fire damage in a Canadian forest finally revealed the truth. Scientists looked at burned tree rings and discovered that huge wildfires once raged in the mountains near Ontario. The savage flames created blankets of black smoke. The smoke traveled high into the atmosphere, darkening the New England skies hundreds of miles away. How do paragraph one and paragraph two work together to present the author's ideas? Paragraph one explains the cause of investigation. Paragraph two shows the results. Paragraph one offers a solution. Paragraph two explains a problem the solution creates. Paragraph one presents facts. Paragraph two presents additional facts on the same topic. Paragraph one and paragraph two do not have a clear connection to each other. Question 4 (Multiple Choice Worth 4 points) (MC) The next question refers to This Mystery Rocks! by Cynthia Schlagel. The sentences have been numbered to help you identify them more easily. This Mystery Rocks! By Cyntha Schlagel 1The Drifting Rocks are a strange phenomenon still unexplained by science. 2Located in Death Valley, California, the rocks sit on hot, flat ground. 3Unlike normal rocks, they have trails etched behind them as if they have traveled across the sand. 4Some trails are only a few feet. 5Some trails are over a half a mile long. 6Each trail is as baffling as the next. 7The variety of rock movement has baffled scientists for decades. 8Some rocks seem to roll as they move forward. 9Some take unexplainable routes. 10Large ones have traveled past small ones that have stayed still. 11Some scientists suggest that the rocks are pushed by wind. 12Others believe they slide on small amounts of ice or mud. 13So far, research has not confirmed any theory. Which sentence best identifies the main idea of paragraph two? Scientists are baffled by the different ways the rocks move. Scientists are confused by the different ways the rocks move, and theories involving wind, ice, and mud have not been confirmed. Scientists have theories of how the rocks move. The rocks have stumped scientists because some roll, some take unexplainable routes, and some have traveled past ones that have stayed still, but scientists have theories that the rocks are pushed by wind or that they slide on ice or mud. Question 5 (Multiple Choice Worth 4 points) (MC) The next question refers to This Mystery Rocks! by Cynthia Schlagel. The sentences have been numbered to help you identify them more easily. This Mystery Rocks! By Cyntha Schlagel 1The Drifting Rocks are a strange phenomenon still unexplained by science. 2Located in Death Valley, California, the rocks sit on hot, flat ground. 3Unlike normal rocks, they have trails etched behind them as if they have traveled across the sand. 4Some trails are only a few feet. 5Some trails are over a half a mile long. 6Each trail is as baffling as the next. 7The variety of rock movement has baffled scientists for decades. 8Some rocks seem to roll as they move forward. 9Some take unexplainable routes. 10Large ones have traveled past small ones that have stayed still. 11Some scientists suggest that the rocks are pushed by wind. 12Others believe they slide on small amounts of ice or mud. 13So far, research has not confirmed any theory. Read the following sentence from This Mystery Rocks!: Unlike normal rocks, they have trails etched behind them as if they have traveled across the sand. How does the sentence contribute to the main idea of paragraph one? It reveals why the drifting rocks are strange. It explains where the rocks may be found. It identifies the persons who are named on the rocks. It offers a solution for why the rocks move. Question 6 (Multiple Choice Worth 4 points) (MC) The next question refers to This Mystery Rocks! by Cynthia Schlagel. The sentences have been numbered to help you identify them more easily. This Mystery Rocks! By Cyntha Schlagel 1The Drifting Rocks are a strange phenomenon still unexplained by science. 2Located in Death Valley, California, the rocks sit on hot, flat ground. 3Unlike normal rocks, they have trails etched behind them as if they have traveled across the sand. 4Some trails are only a few feet. 5Some trails are over a half a mile long. 6Each trail is as baffling as the next. 7The variety of rock movement has baffled scientists for decades. 8Some rocks seem to roll as they move forward. 9Some take unexplainable routes. 10Large ones have traveled past small ones that have stayed still. 11Some scientists suggest that the rocks are pushed by wind. 12Others believe they slide on small amounts of ice or mud. 13So far, research has not confirmed any theory. Which choice best describes how the author organized information? Cause and effect Chronological order Fact by fact Problem-solution Question 7 (Multiple Choice Worth 4 points) (HC) The next question refers to Shedding Light on a Dark Day, by Robin Meriwether. The paragraphs have been numbered to help you identify them more easily. Shedding Light on a Dark Day, by Robin Meriwether On May 19, 1780, the skies over New England turned dark in the middle of the day. For more than two hundred years, New England's Dark Day had been shrouded in mystery. Some blamed volcanoes. Some suggested supernatural events. Some claimed it was a sign from the heavens. No one knew for certain what happened. Many thought the mystery would never be solved. Researchers at the University of Missouri were fascinated by the case. They began examining trees in all surrounding areas. Fire damage in a Canadian forest finally revealed the truth. Scientists looked at burned tree rings and discovered that huge wildfires once raged in the mountains near Ontario. The savage flames created blankets of black smoke. The smoke traveled high into the atmosphere, darkening the New England skies hundreds of miles away. A student attempting to identify the main idea of paragraph two wrote the following sentence: When researchers at the University of Missouri began examining trees in surrounding areas, fire damage in a Canadian forest revealed that huge wildfires in the mountains near Ontario darkened the New England skies hundreds of miles away. Which sentence best describes the student's sentence? The student's sentence does not include enough information from the paragraph. The student's sentence leaves out too many important details from the paragraph. The student's sentence perfectly and properly captures the main idea of the paragraph. The student's sentence shows the main idea but does not paraphrase the author's words. Question 8 (Multiple Choice Worth 3 points) (LC) Which choice provides the most accurate definition of a summary? A long, paraphrased version of a text that mentions its key points A shortened, paraphrased version of a text A shortened, paraphrased version of a text that mentions its key points A shortened version of a text that mentions its key points Question 9 (Essay Worth 20 points) (HC) Read The Ins and Outs of Bellybutton Lint, by Joel Guthrie. Using the steps discussed in this lesson, write a one-paragraph summary in the text box that follows the article. The Ins and Outs of Bellybutton Lint, by Joel Guthrie Some scientists gaze into outer space to look for answers. Some scientists seek answers in the depths of the sea. When Georg Steinhauser wanted answers, he looked within himself. Well, he looked within his bellybutton to be exact. The Austrian chemist spent three years researching the contents of his navel and the navels of others. He has solved one of life's greatest mysteries. We now know exactly what bellybutton lint contains! Steinhauser presented his findings in the online version of the journal Medical Hypotheses. The Vienna University scientist analyzed over 500 samples to determine the exact makeup of the lint. As suspected, most of the lint was made up of cotton from clothing. The fabric pieces are not alone, though. Steinhauser found that the average bellybutton also contained pieces of dead skin, sweat, dust, and fat. Steinhauser's notes also explained how lint accumulates. Stomach hairs tend to grow in a circular pattern around the bellybutton. The hairs act like small hooks, capturing and holding contents within. Shaving stomach hair can lead to a lint-free bellybutton, but don't act too hastily. Although the contents of your navel may be a nuisance, research suggests that lint has a purpose. It is nature's way of protecting your bellybutton from germs and unwanted objects.

    • 3 months ago
  2. dragonknight326 Group Title
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    @MelissaHolmes

    • 3 months ago
  3. MelissaHolmes Group Title
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    For Number 2, I would say: For over two hundred years, the reason for New England's Dark Day was unknown. Finally, researchers from the University of Missouri discovered that wildfire smoke from Canada rose up to the atmosphere, traveled hundreds of miles, and blotted out the sunlight over New England. --> because this basically sums up the paragraphs' meaning. For Number 3, I would say: Paragraph one explains the cause of investigation. Paragraph two shows the results. --> paragraph 1 says that no one knows why the skies are dark. Paragraph 2 says why the skies are dark. For Number 4, I would say: Scientists are confused by the different ways the rocks move, and theories involving wind, ice, and mud have not been confirmed. --> this is the only one that is completely accurate For Number 5, I would say: It reveals why the drifting rocks are strange. Number 6: Fact by fact --> it offers no solution, but no direct order of events... It states a bunch of facts Number 7: The student's sentence shows the main idea but does not paraphrase the author's words. --> its almost exactly like the paragraph The last two are coming.....

    • 3 months ago
  4. MelissaHolmes Group Title
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    Number 8: A shortened, paraphrased version of a text that mentions its key points --> this is because you cannot make a summary word for word, and its not long... Number 9: ooookay then.... this is a summary... so you would say something along the lines of "Steinhauser looked in his belly button and studied how bellybutton lint gathers, and what it is. He explains that bellybutton lint is made up of cotton, bits of fat, sweat, and dust. He then explains that the purpose of the lint is to protect your stomach from outside germs." that one was a bit disturbing O.o anyhow, I hope this helps :D

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