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305student1

  • 7 months ago

What aspect of Bertie's character is revealed through his interactions with Aunt Agatha?

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  1. 305student1
    • 7 months ago
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    She sprang it on me before breakfast. There in seven words you have a complete character sketch of my Aunt Agatha. I could go on indefinitely about brutality and lack of consideration. I merely say that she routed me out of bed to listen to her painful story somewhere in the small hours. It can't have been half past eleven when Jeeves, my man, woke me out of the dreamless and broke the news: 'Mrs Gregson to see you, sir.' I thought she must be walking in her sleep, but I crawled out of bed and got into a dressing-gown. I knew Aunt Agatha well enough to know that, if she had come to see me, she was going to see me. That's the sort of woman she is. She was sitting bolt upright in a chair, staring into space. When I came in she looked at me in that darn critical way that always makes me feel as if I had gelatin where my spine ought to be. Aunt Agatha is one of those strong-minded women. I should think Queen Elizabeth must have been something like her. She bosses her husband, Spencer Gregson, a battered little chappie on the Stock Exchange. She bosses my cousin, Gussie Mannering-Phipps. She bosses her sister-in-law, Gussie's mother. And, worst of all, she bosses me. She has an eye like a man-eating fish, and she has got moral suasion down to a fine point. I dare say there are fellows in the world—men of blood and iron, don't you know, and all that sort of thing—whom she couldn't intimidate; but if you're a chappie like me, fond of a quiet life, you simply curl into a ball when you see her coming, and hope for the best. My experience is that when Aunt Agatha wants you to do a thing you do it, or else you find yourself wondering why those fellows in the olden days made such a fuss when they had trouble with the Spanish Inquisition. 'Halloa, Aunt Agatha!' I said 'Bertie,' she said, 'you look a sight. You look perfectly dissipated.' I was feeling like a badly wrapped brown-paper parcel. I'm never at my best in the early morning. I said so. 'Early morning! I had breakfast three hours ago, and have been walking in the park ever since, trying to compose my thoughts.' If I ever breakfasted at half past eight I should walk on the Embankment, trying to end it all in a watery grave. 'I am extremely worried, Bertie. That is why I have come to you.' And then I saw she was going to start something, and I bleated weakly to Jeeves to bring me tea. But she had begun before I could get it. 'What are your immediate plans, Bertie?' 'Well, I rather thought of tottering out for a bite of lunch later on, and then possibly staggering round to the club, and after that, if I felt strong enough, I might trickle off to Walton Heath for a round of golf.' 'I am not interested in your totterings and tricklings. I mean, have you any important engagements in the next week or so?' I scented danger. 'Rather,' I said. 'Heaps! Millions! Booked solid!' 'What are they?' 'I—er—well, I don't quite know.' 'I thought as much. You have no engagements. Very well, then, I want you to start immediately for America.' 'America!' Do not lose sight of the fact that all this was taking place on an empty stomach, shortly after the rising of the lark. 'Yes, America. I suppose even you have heard of America?' 'But why America?' 'Because that is where your Cousin Gussie is. He is in New York, and I can't get at him.' 'What's Gussie been doing?' Gussie is making a perfect idiot of himself.' To one who knew young Gussie as well as I did, the words opened up a wide field for speculation. 'In what way?' 'He has lost his head over a creature.' On past performances this rang true.

  2. 305student1
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    User: Mario Arce In Course: English II V14 ( 3931) Instructor: Rita Goodwin [E-Mail] You have 8 Unread E-Mail Messages WARNING: You must not leave this exam form! If you try to click back into this exam again prior to submitting, your access to it will be denied! 01.17 Module One Exam Warning: There is a checkbox at the bottom of the exam form that you MUST check prior to submitting this exam. Failure to do so may cause your work to be lost. Question 1 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points) (LC) Read the sentence below and answer the corresponding question. I will never forget the happy look on my daughter's face as she read her acceptance letter. Which word is a synonym for happy as used in the sentence? annoyed bitter ecstatic incensed Question 2 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points) (LC) "A Valentine" by Edgar Allan Poe For her this rhyme is penned whose luminous eyes, Brightly expressive as the twins of Leda, Shall find her own sweet name, that nestling lies Upon the page, enwrapped from every reader. Search narrowly the lines!—they hold a treasure Divine—a talisman—an amulet That must be worn at heart. Search well the measure— The words—the syllables! Do not forget The trivialest point, or you may lose your labor And yet there is in this no Gordian knot Which one might not undo without a sabre, If one could merely comprehend the plot. Enwritten upon the leaf where now are peering Eyes scintillating soul, there lie perdus Three eloquent words oft uttered in the hearing Of poets, by poets—as the name is a poet's, too, Its letters, although naturally lying Like the knight Pinto—Mendez Ferdinando— Still form a synonym for Truth—Cease trying! You will not read the riddle, though you do the best you can do. Based on the lines 5 and 6, what is the best meaning of treasure Divine? Precious item Inconsequential object Frivolous amulet Incredible wealth Question 3 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points) (LC) "A Valentine" by Edgar Allan Poe For her this rhyme is penned whose luminous eyes, Brightly expressive as the twins of Leda, Shall find her own sweet name, that nestling lies Upon the page, enwrapped from every reader. Search narrowly the lines!—they hold a treasure Divine—a talisman—an amulet That must be worn at heart. Search well the measure— The words—the syllables! Do not forget The trivialest point, or you may lose your labor And yet there is in this no Gordian knot Which one might not undo without a sabre, If one could merely comprehend the plot. Enwritten upon the leaf where now are peering Eyes scintillating soul, there lie perdus Three eloquent words oft uttered in the hearing Of poets, by poets—as the name is a poet's, too, Its letters, although naturally lying Like the knight Pinto—Mendez Ferdinando— Still form a synonym for Truth—Cease trying! You will not read the riddle, though you do the best you can do. What does the phrase search narrowly, used in line 5, mean? To look scarcely To look closely To look with decreasing attention To look with increasing attention Question 4 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points) (LC) Which of these sentences is punctuated correctly? I need to leave for school right now; because I don't have all of my school supplies gathered. I need to leave for school right now; but I don't have all of my school supplies gathered. I need to leave for school right now; although I don't have all of my school supplies gathered. I need to leave for school right now; however, I don't have all of my school supplies gathered. Question 5 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points) (MC) "A Valentine" by Edgar Allan Poe For her this rhyme is penned whose luminous eyes, Brightly expressive as the twins of Leda, Shall find her own sweet name, that nestling lies Upon the page, enwrapped from every reader. Search narrowly the lines!—they hold a treasure Divine—a talisman—an amulet That must be worn at heart. Search well the measure— The words—the syllables! Do not forget The trivialest point, or you may lose your labor And yet there is in this no Gordian knot Which one might not undo without a sabre, If one could merely comprehend the plot. Enwritten upon the leaf where now are peering Eyes scintillating soul, there lie perdus Three eloquent words oft uttered in the hearing Of poets, by poets—as the name is a poet's, too, Its letters, although naturally lying Like the knight Pinto—Mendez Ferdinando— Still form a synonym for Truth—Cease trying! You will not read the riddle, though you do the best you can do. Knowing that the Latin root scintilla means spark, what is the meaning of the word scintillating in line 14? Brilliant Dispirited Tedious Listless Question 6 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points) (MC) from "EXTRICATING YOUNG GUSSIE" by P.G. Wodehouse She sprang it on me before breakfast. There in seven words you have a complete character sketch of my Aunt Agatha. I could go on indefinitely about brutality and lack of consideration. I merely say that she routed me out of bed to listen to her painful story somewhere in the small hours. It can't have been half past eleven when Jeeves, my man, woke me out of the dreamless and broke the news: 'Mrs Gregson to see you, sir.' I thought she must be walking in her sleep, but I crawled out of bed and got into a dressing-gown. I knew Aunt Agatha well enough to know that, if she had come to see me, she was going to see me. That's the sort of woman she is. She was sitting bolt upright in a chair, staring into space. When I came in she looked at me in that darn critical way that always makes me feel as if I had gelatin where my spine ought to be. Aunt Agatha is one of those strong-minded women. I should think Queen Elizabeth must have been something like her. She bosses her husband, Spencer Gregson, a battered little chappie on the Stock Exchange. She bosses my cousin, Gussie Mannering-Phipps. She bosses her sister-in-law, Gussie's mother. And, worst of all, she bosses me. She has an eye like a man-eating fish, and she has got moral suasion down to a fine point. I dare say there are fellows in the world—men of blood and iron, don't you know, and all that sort of thing—whom she couldn't intimidate; but if you're a chappie like me, fond of a quiet life, you simply curl into a ball when you see her coming, and hope for the best. My experience is that when Aunt Agatha wants you to do a thing you do it, or else you find yourself wondering why those fellows in the olden days made such a fuss when they had trouble with the Spanish Inquisition. 'Halloa, Aunt Agatha!' I said 'Bertie,' she said, 'you look a sight. You look perfectly dissipated.' I was feeling like a badly wrapped brown-paper parcel. I'm never at my best in the early morning. I said so. 'Early morning! I had breakfast three hours ago, and have been walking in the park ever since, trying to compose my thoughts.' If I ever breakfasted at half past eight I should walk on the Embankment, trying to end it all in a watery grave. 'I am extremely worried, Bertie. That is why I have come to you.' And then I saw she was going to start something, and I bleated weakly to Jeeves to bring me tea. But she had begun before I could get it. 'What are your immediate plans, Bertie?' 'Well, I rather thought of tottering out for a bite of lunch later on, and then possibly staggering round to the club, and after that, if I felt strong enough, I might trickle off to Walton Heath for a round of golf.' 'I am not interested in your totterings and tricklings. I mean, have you any important engagements in the next week or so?' I scented danger. 'Rather,' I said. 'Heaps! Millions! Booked solid!' 'What are they?' 'I—er—well, I don't quite know.' 'I thought as much. You have no engagements. Very well, then, I want you to start immediately for America.' 'America!' Do not lose sight of the fact that all this was taking place on an empty stomach, shortly after the rising of the lark. 'Yes, America. I suppose even you have heard of America?' 'But why America?' 'Because that is where your Cousin Gussie is. He is in New York, and I can't get at him.' 'What's Gussie been doing?' Gussie is making a perfect idiot of himself.' To one who knew young Gussie as well as I did, the words opened up a wide field for speculation. 'In what way?' 'He has lost his head over a creature.' On past performances this rang true. What aspect of Bertie's character is revealed through his interactions with Aunt Agatha? He is disrespectful of women. He is jovial and light-hearted. He is self-conscious about his activities. He is weak-willed when it comes to family.

  3. Snoopy_Lascano
    • 7 months ago
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    what's your choice?

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