anonymous
  • anonymous
Let’s assume the following statements are true: Historically, 75% of the five-star football recruits in the nation go to universities in the three most competitive athletic conferences. Historically, five-star recruits get full football scholarships 93% of the time. If this pattern holds true for this year’s recruiting class, answer the following: REST OF QUESTION IN COMMENTS
Mathematics
chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
a. Based on these numbers, what is the probability that a randomly selected five-star recruit who chooses one of the best three conferences will be offered a full football scholarship? b. What are the odds a randomly selected five-star recruit will not select a university from one of the three best conferences? Explain. c. Explain whether these are independent or dependent events. Are they Inclusive or exclusive? Explain.
perl
  • perl
would you like help with this?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes please @perl

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perl
  • perl
i need to leave right now, emergency, i will be back in 5 minutes, is that ok?
perl
  • perl
this is all the information given, correct?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yeah that's it @perl
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think I know the answe to b and c but I have no idea for a. Here are my answers so far: a) b) The odds against a five-star football recruit going to a university from one of the three best conferences is 1:3, because since they have a 3/4 probability of going to one, there is 1 to 3 odds against c) This is an inclusive event because a five-star football player could go to one of the universities in the three most athletic conferences and have a full football scholarship at the same time. It is also a dependent event, because if you don't go to a university or college, then you can't get a scholarship. @perl
perl
  • perl
it would also help to define these terms what is a five star football recruit?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think it means someone who is extremely good at football and is playing football as a career?
perl
  • perl
i think it means that a student is recruited from high school by a college athletic coach
anonymous
  • anonymous
Oh okay
perl
  • perl
for part a) , lets do it this way. Let A = five start recruit goes to university in one of three most competitive athletic conferences B = five star recruit gets full football scholarship we want to know P( A & B ) P(A & B ) = P( A ) * P(B) = .75 * .93
perl
  • perl
i presume that a 5 star college football recruit has his choice of college . the five star means he has the highest rating
anonymous
  • anonymous
Wait, so does that mean that this is an independent event? I thought this was a dependent event, because you can't get a scholarship if you don't go to a college
perl
  • perl
i see what youre saying, but i dont see any other way to solve this , but by treating the events as independent
anonymous
  • anonymous
My course says that to find the probability of a dependent event is: P( A and B) = P(A) * (B following A). But I don't know how to find the "B following A" part
perl
  • perl
you have to understand that all the athletic colleges know about the five star recruits, they are nationally known. so they offer scholarships to these high school students, even if they don't commit to going to college.
perl
  • perl
these athletes are highest ranked in the country, so they get to choose which athletic college they want to go to. And colleges pre-offer scholarships to the five star recruit athletes
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ohhhh that makes a lot more sense, so in that case, this is an independent event right?
perl
  • perl
so here P(B | A ) = P(B)
perl
  • perl
here is an example http://ukrecruiting.bloginky.com/2015/05/19/calipari-offers-scholarship-to-another-five-star-recruit/
anonymous
  • anonymous
I got about 69.75% for the answer to a, is that right?
perl
  • perl
correct
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay thank you so much! You're very helpful!
perl
  • perl
they are independent , because all the athletic colleges are willing to offer these five star recruits scholarships , regardless of where the athlete makes his final pick. of course the college cannot read his mind before he makes his pick.
perl
  • perl
think of a scholarship as a way of a college saying, come to *my* school.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Actually, wouldn't the probability be higher, since in the original question a says that the football recruit will for sure be going to a college
perl
  • perl
colleges generate a lot of money from athletes
perl
  • perl
from the games, ticket sales, etc
perl
  • perl
the probability would be lower because you are multiplying probabilities
anonymous
  • anonymous
But the original problem says that for sure the football guy will be going to a university
perl
  • perl
we are asking about the probability of going to a university in the three most competitive athletic conference and being offered a full scholarship .
perl
  • perl
so you are talking about a select few colleges or a subset of colleges, the three most competitive atheletic conference college (whatever that means)
perl
  • perl
that article i posted gives you an example of an early scholarship offer `The 6-foot-10 prospect from Austin is considered by Scout.com to be the No. 15 overall prospect in the class of 2016. Kansas, Texas and Baylor also have extended early scholarship offers.` http://ukrecruiting.bloginky.com/2015/05/19/calipari-offers-scholarship-to-another-five-star-recruit/
perl
  • perl
75% of five star recruits end up going to the three most athletic conference college. and 93% of five star recruits get a full scholarship, regardless of the athletic college they go to (whether its in the three most athletic conference or not).

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