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anonymous

  • one year ago

Please help I will medal! I am confused on how to solve this question: A thundercloud has an electric charge of 43.2 C near the top of the cloud and -38.7 near the bottom of the cloud. The magnitude of the electric force between these two charges is 3.95 x 10^6 N. What is the average separation between these charges? (kc=8.99 x 10^9 N m^2/C^2)

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @iGreen @gleem @emma.monsterr

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Im sorry, i didnt learn these yet but good luck :/

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok thank you :/

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @OpenStudyRocks5* @Greg_D @horsegirl325

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The only thing I can think of is to subtract maybe but that comes out too 81.5 and I dont think thats right

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Hi! You can use the Coulomb's force law here...

  7. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    seems they want you to use coulumbs law F = k q1 q2 / r^2

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I believe the equation I am supposed to use is in the question above. However, I dont understand how to solve with this equation.

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Greg_D

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    note that you are given both charges: \[q_1=43.2C\] \[q_2=-38.7C\] and \[F=3.95\times 10^6 N\] you are also given kc, which is k in the eq of IrishBoy you can just replace and finde the value for r, which represents the distance.... give it a try!

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So I would solve 3.95 x 10^6 N =8.99 x 10^9 N m^2/C^2 (43.2C)(-38.7C) / r^2?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yeah!! get r from there

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok can you help me solve it? Just so I know I dont get the wrong answer?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    we can both make calculations and check togheter... let me see what i get...

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Alright I'll let you know what I get.

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    just a detail, we dont need to use the minus sign for the second charge!

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Alright!

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I got 1.95 x 10^3 what did you get?

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the same!!! :) what do you thinks the units should be?

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    m?

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sure! it is a distence, so meters!

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    good work :)

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thank you!

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    This correct right? @glittergurl0101

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes, this is correct :) @Ella31224

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