A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

Describe the balance of forces that hold together the nuclei of atoms. What happens when these forces get out of balance? **Not sure how to explain this! Thank you:)

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    the force which is acting among protons and neutrons, is the so called strong nuclear force. Such force can be explained, introducing a particle mediator of that nuclear force. Such mediator particle, is the pi meson (pion) , whose mass is about 140 MeV. In other words, as electromagnetic force is due to the mediator which is the photon, in the same way the nuclear force is due to an exchange, among the nucleons, of a pion, or meson pi, in fact the nuclear force is described inside a theory which is calle OPEP namely One Pion Exchange Potential

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ohhh okay! and so when they get out of balance, what happens? :/

  3. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    when a nucleon, for example a proton, is out of the range of the nuclear force, then on it will act the electrostatic force, so it will repelled by other protons. When a neutron is out of the range of a nuclear force, then that nucleus will become instable

  4. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    the nuclear force, acting among nucleons, is very attractive, nevertheless its range it is very short, that range is about 10^-14 cm

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ohhh okay! thank you!! :D

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    and so this problem is complete? :O

  7. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    yes! I think so! If you want I can give you a simple computation, of the range of the strong nuclear force

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok!

  9. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    keep in mind that the mediator particle, namely the pion or pi meson , was introduced by the famous physicist Hideki Yukawa (Japan) in the past 1934

  10. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    Now, we can consider the pion a so called "virtual particle". It is virtual not, because it doesn't exist, it is called virtual because its existence violates the Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh! Okay:)

  12. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    so, we can write this equation: \[\Large \Delta E\Delta t \leqslant \hbar \] it is the violation of the Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle, as you can see

  13. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    Now, we can replace \Delat E, with the mass of the pion, namely: \[\Large \Delta E = {M_\pi }{c^2} = 140MeV\]

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oohhh okay!

  15. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    then we can solve that equation for \Delta t, being \Delta t the existence time of the pion, so we get: \[\Large \Delta t \simeq \frac{\hbar }{{140}}\]

  16. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    Now, since the velocity of the pion is close to the light speed, then we can find the spoace traveled by our pion, using this formula: \[\Large d = c\Delta t = \frac{{\hbar c}}{{140}} = \frac{{197}}{{140}} = 1.4fm\] being \[\Large \hbar c = 197MeV \cdot fm\] and \[\Large 1fm = {10^{ - 13}}cm\] fm=fermi

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ohh okay!! :O

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thank you!!

  19. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    thank you!!

  20. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.