anonymous
  • anonymous
Need help with...music math??? 0-0 .(I WILL GIVE MEDAL AND FAN!)http://snag.gy/UZXxi.jpg
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
How do we flag spam?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Report abuse/block user on his answer
anonymous
  • anonymous
@IrishBoy123

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
@amistre64
amistre64
  • amistre64
yeah, i never covered this type of stuff in music class, just learned how to read it and play the trombone.
amistre64
  • amistre64
i cant find a good solution to this, not without taking acoustic/music theory
amistre64
  • amistre64
not D3, D# perhaps
anonymous
  • anonymous
sorry afk >< and It's a math problem from math class :P
amistre64
  • amistre64
The perfect 5th below D# is a G# but i dont know its frequency yet
anonymous
  • anonymous
Huh? >< Might wanna take another gander at the problem it is shooting frequencies no notes there D# and G# are out of my horizon.
amistre64
  • amistre64
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/31 yeah, apparently the notation like G4 means 4th octave above middle g?
amistre64
  • amistre64
at any rate, i might have a solution strategy when we double the frequency, we step an octave. an octave is divided into 12 or 13 half steps .. and perfect and major are just names that i see no bearing on frequenct
anonymous
  • anonymous
LiteLegacy.exe has stopped working: huh?
amistre64
  • amistre64
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/31
amistre64
  • amistre64
the scale they give is a number off: D3 has the D2 value 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 A 55.000 110.000 220.000 440.000 880.000 1,760.000 1 # 58.270 116.541 233.082 466.164 932.328 1,864.655 2 B 61.735 123.471 246.942 493.883 987.767 1,975.533 3 C 65.406 130.813 261.626 523.251 1,046.502 2,093.005 4 # 69.296 138.591 277.183 554.365 1,108.731 2,217.461 5 D 73.416 146.832 293.665 587.330 1,174.659 2,349.318 6 # 77.782 155.563 311.127 622.254 1,244.508 2,489.016 7 E 82.407 164.814 329.628 659.255 1,318.510 2,637.020 8 F 87.307 174.614 349.228 698.456 1,396.913 2,793.826 9 # 92.499 184.997 369.994 739.989 1,479.978 2,959.955 10 G 97.999 195.998 391.995 783.991 1,567.982 3,135.963 11 # 103.826 207.652 415.305 830.609 1,661.219 3,322.438
anonymous
  • anonymous
AH thank you kindly or that.
anonymous
  • anonymous
the heck.....I might just wing the answers because I am totally confuse
amistre64
  • amistre64
a 5th is 7 half steps ... according to the links E is the perfect 5th above A, since it is A+7 steps
amistre64
  • amistre64
D-7 gets us to G so D2 is where we start and we drop to G1
anonymous
  • anonymous
...I am going to get this in Hz units right ?
amistre64
  • amistre64
A4 is 440 (your A5) half of that is 220, so what is 440+2(220)? this gets us 2 full octaves above it
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh!! Nice algebra there !!
amistre64
  • amistre64
ive got that off, i didnt see the octave right
amistre64
  • amistre64
if we start at 440 440+440 gets us 1 octave, we double the start 2(440) is on octave, then double again 2(2)(440) is 2 octaves above
amistre64
  • amistre64
i see no rhyme or reason to it other than the octaves ... the fifths and whatnots are just from the table
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ah okay Gotcha ^^
amistre64
  • amistre64
for example A1 = 55, A2=110 for an interval of length 55 55/13 = 4.23... assuming each half step is linear (but its not) 55 + 7(55)/13 = 84.615.... E is a 5th above A, but that table shows E1=82.4, not 84.6 so i got no real recourse for that
anonymous
  • anonymous
0-0 what about the D3 ? (the example kinda confused me)
amistre64
  • amistre64
D3 = 146.8 D2 = 73.4 for an interval length of 73.4 146.8 -7(73.4)/13 = 107.27 , which is no where close to 98
amistre64
  • amistre64
the labeling on the site i got the table from is 1 off D2, - (7 steps) = G1 G1 has a value of about 98 rowG col1
amistre64
  • amistre64
we can table up percentages ... but all thats doing is reorganizing a table that someone else has written
anonymous
  • anonymous
math must really hate me...I will just wing it on the second one ><
amistre64
  • amistre64
.06 .12 .18 .26 .32 as approximations, the percentages seem to be linear
anonymous
  • anonymous
0-0
amistre64
  • amistre64
I dont know music theory so i cant comment on the verity of it.
anonymous
  • anonymous
lol it's okay :) Thank for your help with everything and sticking with me for an hour.
amistre64
  • amistre64
lets say we start at a freq of 55, the interval of the octave is also 55. .06 of the interval is a step; A = 55 A# = 55 + .06(55) = 58.3 G = 58.3(1.06) = 61.8 G#= 61.8(1.06) = 65.5 E= 55(1.06)^7 = 82.7, ball park E is a perfect 5th above A -------------------------- if D3 = 146.83, our rate of change is 1-.06 = .94 lets test this out 146.83(.94)^7 = 95.22 which is in the ball park of 98 as far as the options go.
amistre64
  • amistre64
oh well, its fun to play with, but thats about it :) good luck
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thx I passed with a 70 % (good enough)
amistre64
  • amistre64
yay! or at least its worth a cookie? meh, it ok i spose lol
anonymous
  • anonymous
Lmbo, I wish for the cookie.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.