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anonymous

  • one year ago

Need help with...music math??? 0-0 .(I WILL GIVE MEDAL AND FAN!) http://snag.gy/UZXxi.jpg

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    How do we flag spam?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Report abuse/block user on his answer

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @IrishBoy123

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @amistre64

  5. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    yeah, i never covered this type of stuff in music class, just learned how to read it and play the trombone.

  6. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    i cant find a good solution to this, not without taking acoustic/music theory

  7. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    not D3, D# perhaps

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sorry afk >< and It's a math problem from math class :P

  9. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    The perfect 5th below D# is a G# but i dont know its frequency yet

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Huh? >< Might wanna take another gander at the problem it is shooting frequencies no notes there D# and G# are out of my horizon.

  11. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/31 yeah, apparently the notation like G4 means 4th octave above middle g?

  12. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    at any rate, i might have a solution strategy when we double the frequency, we step an octave. an octave is divided into 12 or 13 half steps .. and perfect and major are just names that i see no bearing on frequenct

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    LiteLegacy.exe has stopped working: huh?

  14. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/31

  15. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    the scale they give is a number off: D3 has the D2 value 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 A 55.000 110.000 220.000 440.000 880.000 1,760.000 1 # 58.270 116.541 233.082 466.164 932.328 1,864.655 2 B 61.735 123.471 246.942 493.883 987.767 1,975.533 3 C 65.406 130.813 261.626 523.251 1,046.502 2,093.005 4 # 69.296 138.591 277.183 554.365 1,108.731 2,217.461 5 D 73.416 146.832 293.665 587.330 1,174.659 2,349.318 6 # 77.782 155.563 311.127 622.254 1,244.508 2,489.016 7 E 82.407 164.814 329.628 659.255 1,318.510 2,637.020 8 F 87.307 174.614 349.228 698.456 1,396.913 2,793.826 9 # 92.499 184.997 369.994 739.989 1,479.978 2,959.955 10 G 97.999 195.998 391.995 783.991 1,567.982 3,135.963 11 # 103.826 207.652 415.305 830.609 1,661.219 3,322.438

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    AH thank you kindly or that.

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the heck.....I might just wing the answers because I am totally confuse

  18. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    a 5th is 7 half steps ... according to the links E is the perfect 5th above A, since it is A+7 steps

  19. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    D-7 gets us to G so D2 is where we start and we drop to G1

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ...I am going to get this in Hz units right ?

  21. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    A4 is 440 (your A5) half of that is 220, so what is 440+2(220)? this gets us 2 full octaves above it

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh!! Nice algebra there !!

  23. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    ive got that off, i didnt see the octave right

  24. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    if we start at 440 440+440 gets us 1 octave, we double the start 2(440) is on octave, then double again 2(2)(440) is 2 octaves above

  25. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    i see no rhyme or reason to it other than the octaves ... the fifths and whatnots are just from the table

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ah okay Gotcha ^^

  27. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    for example A1 = 55, A2=110 for an interval of length 55 55/13 = 4.23... assuming each half step is linear (but its not) 55 + 7(55)/13 = 84.615.... E is a 5th above A, but that table shows E1=82.4, not 84.6 so i got no real recourse for that

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    0-0 what about the D3 ? (the example kinda confused me)

  29. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    D3 = 146.8 D2 = 73.4 for an interval length of 73.4 146.8 -7(73.4)/13 = 107.27 , which is no where close to 98

  30. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    the labeling on the site i got the table from is 1 off D2, - (7 steps) = G1 G1 has a value of about 98 rowG col1

  31. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    we can table up percentages ... but all thats doing is reorganizing a table that someone else has written

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    math must really hate me...I will just wing it on the second one ><

  33. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    .06 .12 .18 .26 .32 as approximations, the percentages seem to be linear

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    0-0

  35. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    I dont know music theory so i cant comment on the verity of it.

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    lol it's okay :) Thank for your help with everything and sticking with me for an hour.

  37. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    lets say we start at a freq of 55, the interval of the octave is also 55. .06 of the interval is a step; A = 55 A# = 55 + .06(55) = 58.3 G = 58.3(1.06) = 61.8 G#= 61.8(1.06) = 65.5 E= 55(1.06)^7 = 82.7, ball park E is a perfect 5th above A -------------------------- if D3 = 146.83, our rate of change is 1-.06 = .94 lets test this out 146.83(.94)^7 = 95.22 which is in the ball park of 98 as far as the options go.

  38. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    oh well, its fun to play with, but thats about it :) good luck

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thx I passed with a 70 % (good enough)

  40. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    yay! or at least its worth a cookie? meh, it ok i spose lol

  41. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Lmbo, I wish for the cookie.

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