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ayyookyndall

  • one year ago

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  1. MeowLover17
    • one year ago
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    Think of the diameter as a line, solve for the midpoint of that line to find the center.

  2. MeowLover17
    • one year ago
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    And the radius is basically the length from the midpoint to the end of the circle, in this case being one of the other coordinates.

  3. MeowLover17
    • one year ago
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    The formula would be

  4. MeowLover17
    • one year ago
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    http://www.purplemath.com/modules/midpoint.htm here

  5. MeowLover17
    • one year ago
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    Good luck thats all the information i can give.

  6. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    where are you stuck? are you stuck on the formula given on the page MeowLover17 gave you?

  7. ayyookyndall
    • one year ago
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    Yes, putting it in.

  8. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    P(-10,-2) and Q(4,6) the x coordinates of each point are -10 and 4 add them up: -10+4 = -6 divide the result by 2: -6/2 = -3 so the x coordinate of the midpoint is x = -3 Do the same for the y coordinates to get the y coordinate of the midpoint

  9. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    very good

  10. ayyookyndall
    • one year ago
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    Thats it for Part A?

  11. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    so that's effectively what this formula \[\LARGE (x_m, y_m) = \left(\frac{x_1+x_2}{2}, \frac{y_1+y_2}{2}\right)\] is saying "add up the corresponding coordinates and divide by 2 to get the midpoint "

  12. ayyookyndall
    • one year ago
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    Okay, got it. :-)

  13. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    yes the midpoint of P and Q is the center because P and Q lie on the same diameter |dw:1432945083421:dw|

  14. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    The radius can be found in 2 ways a) find the distance from the midpoint, ie center, to P or Q (pick one) b) find the distance from P to Q, then divide by 2

  15. ayyookyndall
    • one year ago
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    Which one will be easier?

  16. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    they're about equal in difficulty since you need to use the distance formula either way

  17. ayyookyndall
    • one year ago
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    I guess lets do A

  18. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    alright, so you can find the distance from the midpoint to P OR find the distance from the midpoint to Q

  19. ayyookyndall
    • one year ago
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    Find the distance from the midpoint to P

  20. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    use the distance formula \[\large d = \sqrt{\left(x_{2}-x_{1}\right)^2+\left(y_{2}-y_{1}\right)^2}\] to find the distance from the midpoint (-3,2) to point P(-10,-2)

  21. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    (x1,y1) = (-3,2) (x2,y2) = (-10,-2)

  22. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    good, now take the square root of that

  23. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    so the exact distance is \[\Large \sqrt{65}\] notice how it says "If your answer is not an integer, express it in radical form"

  24. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    "radical" is math term for "square root, cube root, fourth root, etc"

  25. ayyookyndall
    • one year ago
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    Did I get it right?

  26. ayyookyndall
    • one year ago
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    Can't I say 8.06

  27. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    8.06 is the approximate distance, but they want the exact form

  28. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    yes that's the radius in exact radical form

  29. ayyookyndall
    • one year ago
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    Are we done or is there more?

  30. ybarrap
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1432944559846:dw|

  31. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    they just want the radius, so we're done

  32. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1432945973861:dw|

  33. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    an integer is a whole number (not just any number)

  34. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    example of integers: -3, -22, 5, 8, 0, 157 example of nonintegers: 2.7, 8.5, \(\large \sqrt{15}\), \(\large \pi\)

  35. ayyookyndall
    • one year ago
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    Oh, I understand. Thank you! ;-)

  36. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    np

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