anonymous
  • anonymous
Maria will spin the arrow on the spinner 3 times. What is the probability that the arrow will stop on A, then B, then C? A. 3/256 B. 1/64 C. 1/12 D. 3/4 http://static.k12.com/calms_media/media/1419500_1420000/1419788/1/c5ef10c6f32d00fbcd3ddf9e21dbc3b4f9747860/MS_Alg_130926_181907.jpg
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
Any ideas anyone
mathmate
  • mathmate
For one single spin, what is probability that it stop on A?
anonymous
  • anonymous
1/4 ?

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mathmate
  • mathmate
Good, B?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thats what i thought, but wasnt sure
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks
mathmate
  • mathmate
I mean the probability of a single spin resting on B?
anonymous
  • anonymous
OH...1/4 also i believe
mathmate
  • mathmate
Yes, can we say the same thing for C?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yep..1/4 too
mathmate
  • mathmate
So getting A, followed by B, followed by C is a three step experiment, where each step is independent of each other. Under these circumstances, the probability of success in all three steps is the product of the probability of each step.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yep..1/4 too
mathmate
  • mathmate
Product means multiply them together.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I did not meen to say that
mathmate
  • mathmate
This is called the multiplication rule!
anonymous
  • anonymous
so multiply 1/4 to the third power
anonymous
  • anonymous
Is it A
mathmate
  • mathmate
To avoid communication errors, I prefer you to type the answer itself, not the letters. But no, it's not A. Did you multiply together the probabilities of each of the three steps?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes and yes A is wrong i think it is 1/64
anonymous
  • anonymous
That's letter B FYI
anonymous
  • anonymous
Am i right
mathmate
  • mathmate
The work you should have shown is 1/4 * 1/4 * 1/4 = 1/64.
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh i did not know i had to show work im really knew to this...also do you know how to medal people? Also was my awnser right
anonymous
  • anonymous
@mathmate Thanks for the help just finished and got a 100% :)
mathmate
  • mathmate
Yes, 1/64 is right. I usually ask for showing work to make sure you're on the right track. Some students guess, and I don't need that for math.
mathmate
  • mathmate
I thought you already gave me a medal, although you don't have to. You would give a medal to someone who gave you help, and you give the medal to show appreciation by giving him/her a medal. You do this by clicking on the blue "best response" button on the right of the receiver's response. BTW, Welcome to Open Study! We're a nice family that you'd enjoy for a long time. Please read the code of conducts, terms and conditions (links at bottom left). Also, be net-aware, do not give out personal information, or traceable information. This is not a dating site, so if someone sends you undesirable messages, click on the "report abuse" button at the bottom of his/her post.
Loser66
  • Loser66
@mathmate can I have question on it? I don't know what is wrong with my logic but no one answer me for my question
mathmate
  • mathmate
@Loser66 yes, please tag me.
Loser66
  • Loser66
No, this kind of problem. I don't have any thing else
Loser66
  • Loser66
The probability to get A is 1/4, sure. But!! to get A at the first spin, it is another topic!!!
anonymous
  • anonymous
@mathmate thanks for the introduction to study island and also thanks for explaining the medals thing.
Loser66
  • Loser66
My argument: at the first spin, we want the outcome is A, that means it is NOT B and NOT C and NOT D as well.
mathmate
  • mathmate
@Loser66 You are right. If you would like to complete the answer, please go ahead. This has to do with the basic axioms of probability.
Loser66
  • Loser66
for B: the probability is 1/4, hence NOT B is 3/4 same as NOT C and NOT D, hence , combine them, to get NOT (B and C and D) = A, the probability to be SURE that is A is (0.75)^3
mathmate
  • mathmate
Exactly. Each of A,B,C,D has equal probability of 1/4 (4*1/4=1).
mathmate
  • mathmate
If you make a single spin, the probability of landing on A is 1/4. Do we agree on this ?
Loser66
  • Loser66
That is my question. What is wrong with it?? to force the first spin is A , we need NOT B and NOT C and NOT D but that argument gives us different result from just pick 1/4 for A
mathmate
  • mathmate
Landing on A implicitly tells us that it is not B, not C and not D. So the conditions are superfluous.
mathmate
  • mathmate
|dw:1432949835677:dw| A,B,C,D are mutually exclusive and complementary.
mathmate
  • mathmate
So if you specify A, automatically it excludes the others.
Loser66
  • Loser66
AAAhh, I got you!!! "EXCLUSIVE" thanks for explanation. gooooooooooooot it
mathmate
  • mathmate
Hope it helped! :)
Loser66
  • Loser66
Surely help. I hate probability, but love logic. hehehe...
mathmate
  • mathmate
Probability is nice, but there are a lot of terms to remember, and their definitions.

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