anonymous
  • anonymous
Can someone walk me through these and help me get the right answer .... A quadrilateral has vertices (2, 0), (0, –2), (–2, 4), and (–4, 2). Which special quadrilateral is formed by connecting the midpoints of the sides? kite rectangle trapezoid rhombus 2. Which of the following describes TVS? The vertices are T(1, 1), V(4, 0), and S(3, 5) isosceles scalene right equilateral 4. Verify that parallelogram ABCD with vertices A(–5, –1), B(–9, 6), C(–1, 5), and D(3, –2) is a rhombus by showing that it is a parallelogram with perpendicular diagonal
Mathematics
jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
hi
anonymous
  • anonymous
Heyy :)
DanJS
  • DanJS
Plot each point, then, Connect the middle of each side and see what you get

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DanJS
  • DanJS
|dw:1432947141416:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
I got a rectangle too! okay thanks
DanJS
  • DanJS
The dotted part is the connected midpoints, that is what the first shape answer is
anonymous
  • anonymous
How would I solve the second one ? @DanJS
DanJS
  • DanJS
The first one is not a rectangle, the dotted shape does not have right angles
anonymous
  • anonymous
hmmm so would it be a trapaoid? or a rhombus?
DanJS
  • DanJS
It is a parallelogram, but that isnt an answer, so i believe this is what it is... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kite_%28geometry%29
DanJS
  • DanJS
a rhombus has all 4 sides of equal length, this one here does not
DanJS
  • DanJS
a trapazoid has only one pair of parallel sides, this one has 2 pairs
DanJS
  • DanJS
It is not a rectangle, so it must be the Kite
anonymous
  • anonymous
OHH yhea it would be Kite I see it now
DanJS
  • DanJS
The second prob.... You have to figure the lengths of each side of the triangle... Equilaterla = all 3 sides the same isosceles = 2 sides the same scalene = all sides different right = 90 degree angle
DanJS
  • DanJS
Did you learn the distance formula between 2 points?
DanJS
  • DanJS
|dw:1432947917511:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yhea , its a squared + b squared = c squared right ?
DanJS
  • DanJS
\[distance = \sqrt{(5-1)^2+(3-1)^2}\]
DanJS
  • DanJS
Do that for all 3 sides
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ohh , so do I just simplify ?
DanJS
  • DanJS
yes, that is the length of that one side. THen you need to compare that to the length of the other sides..
DanJS
  • DanJS
\[distance2=\sqrt{(0-5)^2+(4-3)^2}\] \[distance3 = \sqrt{(0-1)^2+(4-1)^2}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
I got 5 for the fist one 11 for the second one and and 5 for the third one
DanJS
  • DanJS
In general, the distance between 2 points... \[D = \sqrt{(y _{2}-y _{1})^2+(x _{2}-x _{1})^2}\]
DanJS
  • DanJS
umm let me calculate and see
DanJS
  • DanJS
\[\sqrt{20}\] \[\sqrt{26}\] \[\sqrt{10}\]
DanJS
  • DanJS
all 3 sides different length, scalene triangle
DanJS
  • DanJS
Recall, if it is a right triangle, the 3 sides will satisfy the pythagorean theorem a^2 + b^2 = c^2 Here it does not, 20 + 10 = 26, NO Not a right triangle
anonymous
  • anonymous
OHH ok so that therom only works for right triangles .
DanJS
  • DanJS
yes
DanJS
  • DanJS
If not a right triangle, you have to use the law of sines and law of cosines to figure side lengths.
anonymous
  • anonymous
okayy

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