A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

Can someone walk me through these and help me get the right answer .... A quadrilateral has vertices (2, 0), (0, –2), (–2, 4), and (–4, 2). Which special quadrilateral is formed by connecting the midpoints of the sides? kite rectangle trapezoid rhombus 2. Which of the following describes TVS? The vertices are T(1, 1), V(4, 0), and S(3, 5) isosceles scalene right equilateral 4. Verify that parallelogram ABCD with vertices A(–5, –1), B(–9, 6), C(–1, 5), and D(3, –2) is a rhombus by showing that it is a parallelogram with perpendicular diagonal

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hi

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Heyy :)

  3. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Plot each point, then, Connect the middle of each side and see what you get

  4. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1432947141416:dw|

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I got a rectangle too! okay thanks

  6. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The dotted part is the connected midpoints, that is what the first shape answer is

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    How would I solve the second one ? @DanJS

  8. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The first one is not a rectangle, the dotted shape does not have right angles

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hmmm so would it be a trapaoid? or a rhombus?

  10. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    It is a parallelogram, but that isnt an answer, so i believe this is what it is... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kite_%28geometry%29

  11. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    a rhombus has all 4 sides of equal length, this one here does not

  12. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    a trapazoid has only one pair of parallel sides, this one has 2 pairs

  13. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    It is not a rectangle, so it must be the Kite

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    OHH yhea it would be Kite I see it now

  15. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The second prob.... You have to figure the lengths of each side of the triangle... Equilaterla = all 3 sides the same isosceles = 2 sides the same scalene = all sides different right = 90 degree angle

  16. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Did you learn the distance formula between 2 points?

  17. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1432947917511:dw|

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yhea , its a squared + b squared = c squared right ?

  19. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \[distance = \sqrt{(5-1)^2+(3-1)^2}\]

  20. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Do that for all 3 sides

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ohh , so do I just simplify ?

  22. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yes, that is the length of that one side. THen you need to compare that to the length of the other sides..

  23. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \[distance2=\sqrt{(0-5)^2+(4-3)^2}\] \[distance3 = \sqrt{(0-1)^2+(4-1)^2}\]

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I got 5 for the fist one 11 for the second one and and 5 for the third one

  25. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    In general, the distance between 2 points... \[D = \sqrt{(y _{2}-y _{1})^2+(x _{2}-x _{1})^2}\]

  26. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    umm let me calculate and see

  27. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \[\sqrt{20}\] \[\sqrt{26}\] \[\sqrt{10}\]

  28. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    all 3 sides different length, scalene triangle

  29. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Recall, if it is a right triangle, the 3 sides will satisfy the pythagorean theorem a^2 + b^2 = c^2 Here it does not, 20 + 10 = 26, NO Not a right triangle

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    OHH ok so that therom only works for right triangles .

  31. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yes

  32. DanJS
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    If not a right triangle, you have to use the law of sines and law of cosines to figure side lengths.

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okayy

  34. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.