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haleyelizabeth2017

  • one year ago

A woman looks out a window of a building. She is 94 feet above the ground. Her line of sight makes an angle of O with the building. The distance in feet of an object from the woman is modeled by the function d = 94 sec θ. How far are objects sighted at 25° and 55°?

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  1. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    They want you to plug in 25 to get some number out for d. Same for 55 keep in mind that sec(theta) = 1/cos(theta)

  2. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    http://web2.0calc.com/#94*(1/cos(25)) when you get to that link, hit the "=" button to have the calculator compute the result

  3. haleyelizabeth2017
    • one year ago
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    I got that, but when I put it into my calc, it gives me answers wayyy off. They are supposed to be something like 104 and 164 feet....I got 94.8366 and 4247.86 :(

  4. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    make sure you are in degree mode

  5. haleyelizabeth2017
    • one year ago
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    Desmos just sucks for sin/cos/tan lol

  6. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    yeah I get 94*(1/cos(25)) = 94.8342749586472074 when I convert to radian mode

  7. haleyelizabeth2017
    • one year ago
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    I'm not sure how to change it on there :(

  8. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    click the wrench on desmos, and click "degrees" to convert to degree mode

  9. haleyelizabeth2017
    • one year ago
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    Figured it out! xD

  10. haleyelizabeth2017
    • one year ago
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    lol....after you tell me :P didn't notice you replied

  11. haleyelizabeth2017
    • one year ago
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    Thank you! Would you mind helping me with one more?

  12. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    sure

  13. haleyelizabeth2017
    • one year ago
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    Okay! Thanks! Lemme find it real quick lol

  14. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    ok

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