anonymous
  • anonymous
The polar coordinates of a point are given. Find the rectangular coordinates of each point. (5,(π / 4)) (-2,(π / 6))
Differential Equations
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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johnweldon1993
  • johnweldon1993
Or instead of going the long way backwards...we can also know that \[\large x = rcos(\theta)\] and \[\large y = rsin(\theta)\]
johnweldon1993
  • johnweldon1993
So for example with your first point up there \[\large x = 5cos(\pi/4)\] \[\large y = 5sin(\pi/4)\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
And I can do the same for the second equation @johnweldon1993

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johnweldon1993
  • johnweldon1993
Correct indeed :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
so \[x=-2(\cos(\pi/6)\]
johnweldon1993
  • johnweldon1993
I just deleted the first post I made so as not to confuse you...why go a long way when there are shortcuts! lol And yes that is correct for your x-coordinate!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thank you so much @johnweldon1993 !
johnweldon1993
  • johnweldon1993
Anytime!
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Johnweldon1993 is it weird that when I go to convert the first they come out to be the same point?
johnweldon1993
  • johnweldon1993
Not weird at all :P Seeing as how \(\large sin(45) = cos(45)\) :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ah, thank you! All this polar stuff is just alsfjasflkajlfa! @johnweldon1993
johnweldon1993
  • johnweldon1993
Lol it will come much easier dont worry :) Actually polar is the easiest of the bunch...wait till you get to cylindrical and spherical THOSE are the best ;) haha
anonymous
  • anonymous
So I'm off to go dig my shallow grave.
johnweldon1993
  • johnweldon1993
Lol well if you are in DE right now, you wont deal with them any if at all...Calc 3 is where that comes into play :) So nope, stay above ground...for now :P lol no try and stay permanently lol :D

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