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anonymous

  • one year ago

Convert Rectangular points into Polar points: (4,0) When converting I got (4,0) using the methods of. sqrt(x^2+y^2) sqrt(4^2+0^2) sqrt(4^2)=4 x=4 y=tan^-1(y/x) tan^-1(0/4)=0 Where do I go from here?

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  1. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    And we know that the tangent of 0 is 0 so that is is Your polar coordinate will be (4,0^\circ)\]

  2. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    Ahh wrote that bad... \[\large (4,0^\circ)\]

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ah I recognize you p: Well thank you again!

  4. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    lol of course! :P

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Really quick question I also have to transform (0,3) and I got (3,0deg) is that right? @johnweldon1993

  6. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    If it's weird to think of a 0 degree...just remember A "polar coordinate" is a point, broken into a radius and an angle from the positive 'x-axis'...for example let's take a random point (5,4) |dw:1433133598811:dw| So if you have a point (4,0) |dw:1433133646240:dw| As you can see, we are already ON the x-axis so there is no angle to make!

  7. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    Hmm... (0,3) Tell me, what is \(\large \tan^{-1}(\frac{3}{0})\)

  8. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    Dividing by 0 Tricky huh? Now obviously this has "imaginary numbers" written all over it BUT!!!! We can look at it graphically as I have posted above |dw:1433133926883:dw|

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    My calculator says (tan^-1(0/3)=0

  10. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    Right (0/3) is indeed 0 But the point you have provided is (0,3) which would lead to \(\large \tan^{-1}(\frac{3}{0})\)

  11. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    Because remember it is \[\large \theta = \tan^{-1}(\frac{y}{x})\]

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Opp. :( silly mistakes will be the end of me!

  13. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    Lol well remember the original slope "rise over run" rise = vertical = y run = horizontal = x :)

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Now I'm still confused because I'm getting 0 still.

  15. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    Or of course, graph it out to make sure you can at least see why |dw:1433134326239:dw| Now you are SOLVING for \(\large \theta\) using tangent which you know is opposite/adjacent so y/x !

  16. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    And your calculator might just be "erroring" out We know very well that anything divided by 0 is "indeterminant" right?

  17. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    The calculator might just be saying "oh that's 0" But now, here it is MUCH easier to look at it from the graphical standpoint to visualize it!

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    AH now I"m thoroughly confused. So now I'm finding the angle. By using 3/0?

  19. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    Lol you should be! :P Right you are using the fact that your point is (0,3) and the formula you are using is indeed \(\large \tan^{-1}(\frac{y}{x})\) meaning \(\large \tan^{-1}(\frac{3}{0})\) which yeah at first...makes NO sense...you CAN'T divide by 0 right?

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yeah, or if you do it's always 0. So that's why I assumed that it would become 0 degree's. But since it's not what do I do? Haha.

  21. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    Oh god take THAT idea out of your brain! lol "or if you do it's always 0" Nope, in algebra we are usually taught this INCORRECT statement for no reason... Now that we have more advanced math behind us...we know better that dividing by 0 will leave us with an error or with an indeterminant decision (meaning we need to look at another way to approach this)....or usually (more often than not) it will actually give us \(\large \infty\) So...here...it will not be 0 degrees because we cannot say 3/0 = 0 ....we say 3/0 does not exist using what we know so far...we need to turn to other methods Like looking at a graph of whats happening :P

  22. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    So to your question "what do I do now" I refer you back to... |dw:1433135202301:dw|

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    How do I find that? Haha, I feel like the more we dive into this the more confused I get p:

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    OH WAIT

  25. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    Oh....I think you have a breakthrough!... lol

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Isn't it 90?

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    because each quadrant has 90degrees right?

  28. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    YES!! :D

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    OH wow that was like.

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay so the final answer is (3,90deg) ?

  31. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    Lol that was literally it, everything else was just from questions that arose from that dividing by 0 thing :P And they might want it in \(\large \pi\) form so probably stick with \[\large (3,(\pi/2))\]

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Gonna go have aneurysm.

  33. johnweldon1993
    • one year ago
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    Lol nahhh you're good! Have a popsicle! :D lol

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