anonymous
  • anonymous
Proofs..
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
@jim_thompson5910 mind helping with one more? :/
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
what's your question?
anonymous
  • anonymous
oops wrong one

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anonymous
  • anonymous
1 Attachment
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
what's the reasoning for line 2? any idea?
anonymous
  • anonymous
No. I mean they are talking about one angle being equal to itself..
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
which property makes that true?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Angle of a triangle? :l I'm clueless
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
when you look into a mirror, you see your ______
anonymous
  • anonymous
REFLECTION
anonymous
  • anonymous
This is why I like your help. you make in understandable.
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
yep REFLEction so the REFLExive property is why A = A is true. it's trivial and seems kinda stupid (of course something is equal to itself, how could it not?) but at the same time it's good to have a rigorous set of rules
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
see the first line http://www.regentsprep.org/regents/math/geometry/gpb/theorems.htm
anonymous
  • anonymous
I feel like you have a folder of math websites. You have so many helpful ones o.o
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
sometimes, but others I google
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
and regents prep tends to pop up a lot (esp with geometry)
anonymous
  • anonymous
ahh.
anonymous
  • anonymous
So what about the last line?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Corresponding sides?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
I'm checking your line 3 and line 4
anonymous
  • anonymous
alright
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
from this link we visited earlier http://www.regentsprep.org/regents/math/geometry/gp11/LsimilarProof.htm I'm going to focus on the SAS similarity theorem. See attached
1 Attachment
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
That theorem says if you have a pair of corresponding congruent angles, and you have that proportion mentioned in the attachment, then the triangles are similar
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay
anonymous
  • anonymous
was one of the lines wrong or are we on the last line?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
so that's the reason for line 3.
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
we only use the AA theorem IF we had 2 congruent corresponding angles. We had that last time, but we don't have that this time
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh..
anonymous
  • anonymous
so would it be sas?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
SAS similarity theorem, yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
is the fourth line okay?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
no, but luckily you might know the theorem
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
you mentioned the AA theorem. What exactly does the AA theorem say?
anonymous
  • anonymous
AA? xD
anonymous
  • anonymous
Angle Angle
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
specifically what does the entire theorem say? (other than just Angle Angle)
anonymous
  • anonymous
To show two triangles are similar, it is sufficient to show that two angles of one triangle are congruent (equal) to two angles of the other triangle. Theorem: If two angles of one triangle are congruent to two angles of another triangle, the triangles are similar.
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
So IF the angles are congruent THEN the triangles are similar flip that around to say... IF the triangles are similar THEN the angles are congruent
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
the theorem you wrote out is the original AA similarity theorem the flipped version is the converse of that said theorem
anonymous
  • anonymous
Alright.. so would it be a converse AA theorem?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
converse of the AA similarity theorem, yep
anonymous
  • anonymous
And then the last line
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
any ideas?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Parallel lines?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
well that's what you want to prove
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
how can you use the previous line?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
https://www.mathsisfun.com/geometry/parallel-lines.html
anonymous
  • anonymous
I dont understand how to use the line before
anonymous
  • anonymous
Traversal something?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
this might be of better help http://www.nhvweb.net/nhhs/math/mschuetz/files/2012/11/Section-3-3-2012-2013.pdf
anonymous
  • anonymous
Which one :/
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
first page
anonymous
  • anonymous
Corresponding angles?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
the converse of the corresponding angles theorem
anonymous
  • anonymous
Once again thank you!
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
np

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