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anonymous

  • one year ago

Identify the independent and dependent variables. Larry is conducting an experiment to see how many inches of snowfall occur each hour during the day. A. Independent: day of the week Dependent: inches of snowfall B. Independent: hours in a day Dependent: inches of snowfall C. Independent: time of day Dependent: inches of snowfall D. Independent: inches of snowfall Dependent: time of day

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @rainbow_rocks03

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @tkhunny

  3. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    Does the day of the week depend on the amount of snow, or does the amount of snow depend on which day of the week it is?

  4. rainbow_rocks03
    • one year ago
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    What do you think the answer is?

  5. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    Or, asked a different way, if you were going to graph this, with amount of snow on one axis, and the day of the week the other, would you make the day of the week be the x-axis, or the amount of snow?

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i think it is D

  7. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    Let's try to understand the concept first, and worry about which answer it is second...

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    well @rainbow_rocks03 asked me what i think it is and so i said D

  9. rainbow_rocks03
    • one year ago
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    I will ask a friend to help you cause I can't sorry

  10. rainbow_rocks03
    • one year ago
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    @tkhunny

  11. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    Okay, why do you think that? Isn't a key to answering this going to be understanding how to identify the independent variable and the dependent variable?

  12. tkhunny
    • one year ago
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    Which can be deliberately selected and which will be unknown until it is measured?

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i thought is was D because you can't control the amount of snow that comes but you can control the time of day you do it at.

  14. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    so the time of day is the independent variable...and the snowfall amount is the dependent variable because it depends on the time of day...

  15. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    or as tkhunny put it, you can select the time of day, so it is the independent variable, and you then measure the snowfall, so it is the dependent variable.

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can you help with another?

  17. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    Only one way to find out :-)

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What is the final balance for the investment? $20,000 for 3 years at 5% compounded annually $ ___________

  19. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    do you know the difference between compound and simple interest?

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no...

  21. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    okay, that's a pretty important thing to understand! Simple interest is computed by taking the principal value (the amount you borrowed or invested), and multiplying it by an interest rate. That gives you the interest for one period. If there are multiple periods, you multiply the interest by the number of periods to get the total interest. An example: I lend you $100 for a year, and charge you 5% interest per year. At the end of 1 year, you owe me the original $100, plus 5% interest on $100, which is 0.05*$100 = $5, for a grand total of $105. If we had an agreement that you could borrow the money for 3 years, still at 5% simple interest each year, each year, the balance would go up by 5% of $100. At the end of 3 years, you would owe me $100 + $5 + $5 + $5 = $115 Does that make sense?

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes that makes since

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so how do i find the answer to this question?

  24. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    Now compound interest is different. Notice that the amount of interest added each period was the same with simple interest — just the percentage times the principal value. With compound interest, the interest is computed by multiplying the entire balance by the percentage. For the first period, the result is the same. For the second period, instead of multiplying the principal balance by the interest rate, we multiply the principal balance + all of the interest owed up to that point. $100 + 5%*$100 = $100+$5 = $105 $105 + 5%*$105 = $105 + $5.25 = $110.25 $110.25 + 5%*$110.25 = $110.25 + $5.51 = $115.76 compare that with simple interest: $100 + 5%*$100 = $100+$5 = $105 $105 + 5%*$100 = $105+$5 = $110 $110 + 5%*$100 = $110+$5 = $115

  25. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    If the interest rate is large, or there are a large number of periods, or both, the compound interest version turns into a much larger number than the simple interest version! For example, if we said 10% interest, and 7 years: $100 turns into $100+10%*$100*7 = $100 + $70 = $170 Compound interest, same interest rate, same number of years: $100 turns into $100(1.1)^7 = $194.87

  26. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    The formula for compound interest is \[FV = PV(1+i)^n\]where \(FV\) is the future value, \(PV\) is the present value, \(i\) is the interest rate, expressed as a decimal, and \(n\) is the number of periods. Here for your problem, we have\[PV=$20,000\]and we want to find \(FV\) after 3 years at 5%, compounded annually. How many periods do we have, and what value do we use for \(i\) in that formula?

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    um..... what do you mean by periods?

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    im confused

  29. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    periods are the chunks of time over which the compounding is done. If you are compounding annually, the length of a compounding period is 1 year. If you are compounding monthly, the length of a compounding period is 1 month.

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok, so we are doing compound annually.... so the period is 3 years

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    on the question

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    for*

  33. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    there are 3 periods... now the interest rate is 5%, how do you express that as a decimal?

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    0.05

  35. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    Correct. So you can write out the formula, substituting all the known values?

  36. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    The formula uses \(n\) as an exponent, and you probably don't know how to typeset things, so just put ^ before the exponent, like 2^3 = \(2^3\)

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    im confused

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    FV=PV(1+i)^n

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    like that?

  40. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @whpalmer4

  41. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    yes, but can you put the numbers in?

  42. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what is FV and PV

  43. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    PV is the amount of money at the start, and FV is the amount in the future. The final balance in the problem is the FV.

  44. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    FV=20,000 and PV=3?

  45. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    20,000=3(1+i)^n

  46. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    no, FV is what we are trying to find. PV is $20,000, i = 0.05, n = 3 so the FV = 20000(1+0.05)^3 which is the same as \[FV = 20000(1+0.05)(1+0.05)(1+0.05) = 20000*(1.05)(1.05)(1.05)\]

  47. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    is the answer 23152.5

  48. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    I believe it is, yes :-)

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