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anonymous

  • one year ago

Graph the function in the interval from 0 to 2pi. y = 2 cos(theta+pi/6)+2 How do I graph this? This is a sample question. I'm preparing for my final and I really need help

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    These are my options. How do I solve the problem and get the correct graph?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    graph2d

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm new to Trignometric Graphing myself I tried around with the trignometric graphing calculator myself and I got the answer as the 2nd graph I'm trying to figure out how

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @girlygirl12151 But how did you get that? I would like to know how to graph problems like these in the future

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @nopen there's such a thing as a graphing calculator? i need one of those :)!

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok first of all the c in the equation which is the 2 is causing vertical shift

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the pi/6 is the horizontal shift. It's moving the graph by 30° to the left (if the radian is positive)

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @nopen okay.. i don't understand much of that, but I understand a little. At least i know what i need to go deeper into studying

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @nopen do you know how i'd tell if the radian is positive. (this might be a dumb question)

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    and the 2 that you see that multiplies with the whole equation is the stretch factor, the larger that number, the more the amplitude will get stretched. here plot the graph in this link: https://illuminations.nctm.org/Activity.aspx?id=3589

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it's simply any number if it's have +pi/whatever number that's positive radian and if it's negative it will have a negative sign

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh okay thank you for all your help. i clearly have a lot to learn about this subject. you've been a real help

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I can tell you one thing though the last graph is absolutely out of the option do you know why?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I mean the first graph

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @nopen Is it because its over the line?

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I mean under

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Nope it's because your equation is have the the +2 y = 2 cos(theta+pi/6)+2 <------- this 2 it means it's have a vertical shift upwards by 2 units

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @nopen and it's under the 2 with the starting point at 4

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the problem says 0-2pi so that makes sense

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yup

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @nopen I have to get ready to go to work. Thank you for the link to the graph calculator and for your help. Have a great day!

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    np

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