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anonymous

  • one year ago

The probability of finding a broken cookie in a bag of chocolate chip cookies is P= .03. Find the probability of getting at least 2 broken cookies in a bag containing 36 cookies. A) .91 B) .294 C) .33 D) .06

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @iGreen

  2. Valpey
    • one year ago
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    Think of this as the opposite of the question: "What is the probability of finding exactly 0 or exactly 1 broken cookie in a bag of cookies?"

  3. Valpey
    • one year ago
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    The probability of getting zero broken cookies is the easiest to calculate because it is just the probability that a single cookie is whole raised to the power of the number of cookies. (disclaimer: we are assuming that cookies being broken are completely independent events which is a horrible horrible assumption if this were in real life since you can drop a bag of cookies and break half of them at once)

  4. Valpey
    • one year ago
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    So, what is the probability of 0 broken cookies out of 36?

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i have no idea.. sorry i dont get this at all.

  6. Valpey
    • one year ago
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    What about a bag of two cookies, what is the probability that both are not broken?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    idk

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Luigi0210 @wio

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Kainui

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @iGreen plz helpp

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @iGreen HELLOOO??? U THERE?????

  12. Valpey
    • one year ago
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    Okay, what about just one cookie, if the chance that it is broken is 0.03, what is the chance that it is not broken?

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    .294??

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Valpey

  15. Valpey
    • one year ago
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    If a cookie is broken 3% of the time, what percent of the time is it not broken?

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    idk can u just tell me i need help and this is my hw and i have a class soon.. just explain it to me

  17. Valpey
    • one year ago
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    I can't give you the answer @iamabarbiegirl. I need your help to think about the probability of these events happening if we are going to get to a binomial process.

  18. Valpey
    • one year ago
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    The chance of two independent events both happening is the product of their respective probabilities multiplied together. So if a cookie is whole, say 90% of the time, then two cookies are whole 90% * 90% of the time. 90% * 90% is equal to 81%. (on a calculator we might say 0.90*0.90)

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