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anonymous

  • one year ago

The figure below shows a shaded circular region inside a larger circle: A shaded circle is shown inside another larger circle. The radius of the smaller circle is labeled as r and the radius of the larger circle is labeled as R. On the right side of the image is written r equal to 3 inches and below r equal to 3 inches is written R equal to 5 inches. What is the probability that a point chosen inside the larger circle is not in the shaded region? 24% 36% 50% 64%

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Jamierox4ev3r

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Jamierox4ev3r

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  4. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    shoot I'm not sure about the whole probability thing x'D

  5. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    but you could solve for area. and then make those ratios

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @iGreen

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @whpalmer4

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @iGreen

  9. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    oh wait nvm i remember x'D lol sorry

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok

  11. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    so yeah. find area. the formula is \(\pi r^{2}\)

  12. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    let's start with the smaller circle: \(A=\pi r^{2}\) A=\(\pi 3^{2}\)

  13. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    so multiply pi by 2.... what do you get? @Marc1313

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    3.14 by 2?

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    6.28

  16. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    i meant by 9..lol sorry xD since \(3^[2]\) is 9

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    28.26

  18. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    **\(3^{2}\)

  19. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    yep. so that's the area of the smaller circle

  20. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    can you find me the area of the larger circle?

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    how

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    this is confusing

  23. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    just do it with this formula i used earlier \(A=\pi r^{2}\) \(A=pi 5^{2}\) which becomes \(A=\pi 25\)

  24. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    multiply pi by 25 to find the area of the larger circle

  25. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    @Marc1313 can you multiply pi by 25 to find the area of the larger circle?

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    85

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Jamierox4ev3r

  28. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    actually, 78.54

  29. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    but close :)

  30. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    there's one final step to find the answer...set the areas as a ratio, like so: \(\Large\frac{28.27}{78.54}\) ^^ then simplify it :)

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    78.5

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    36%

  33. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    yep :) make sense?

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    a little

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    are you sure that si the answer

  36. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    cool. basically, find the areas, and then make a ratio (fancy way of saying division) :)

  37. Jamierox4ev3r
    • one year ago
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    positive. I remember this unit now, lol i realized that it wasn't probability, it was just ratios :P

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thank you so much next question

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