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anonymous

  • one year ago

*Geometry* Can someone please help me figure out this problem!

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  2. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    Its a picture, id say of intersecting circles ... what is it you are trying to do with it?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh I'm sorry I forgot to include the question!

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Prove that the two circles shown below are similar.

  5. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    oh, we would need to know how your material defines similarity.

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay, can you explain how I would do that? I didn't pay attention in class and I'm really regretting it know lol

  7. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    i dont have your material, so i wouldnt know how they define it. Your grade is based on what your material gives you.

  8. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    an idea tho, is to move both so that they are centered at the origin, and then you can dilate one into the other.

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So, (an idea) of how they would be similar is that if the enlarge the smaller one 'x' times it would be the same as the larger one?

  10. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    thats the idea yes. how your material covers it tho, i havent a clue about. but impretty sure it follows that process.

  11. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    we can also determine a center of dilation if we dont want to move the circles.

  12. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1433433039193:dw|

  13. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    i think its easier to move them tho

  14. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    the radius and circumference are linear measures. radius y = 3 radius x = 2(3) circumference x = 2(3)pi = 6pi circumference y = 2[2(3)]pi = 2(6) pi they have a common among corresponding sides. but im not sure how well this conforms to your material.

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thank you so much for answering everything @amistre64 . Sorry I could answer you but it said the site was down for some reason.

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