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anonymous

  • one year ago

WILL MEDAL AND FAN Solve for x: 3 over 4 x + 5 over 8 = 4x it will be a fraction...

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  1. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    You mean this? |dw:1433463970632:dw|

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I can't do fractions... I am better at decimals, so thanks for the help!

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    first, we isolate the variable, right.. SO we would do something with 5/8

  4. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    We can do this equation with decimals because the decimals in this case are simple and terminate. If you have a fraction which is a non-terminating decimal, changing fractions into decimals won't be such a good idea, so I think it's better to keep the fractions as fractions and work through them.

  5. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Yes, we do want to isolate the variable, so we need all terms with x on the left side.

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    would we add 5/8 to the other side?

  7. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    We also want all simple numbers on the right side. Let's start by moving the 5/8 to the right side.

  8. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    To decide whether we add 5/8 or subtract 5/8, you need to see what the 5/8 is doing where it is now.

  9. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    The 5/8 is being added on the left side. The opposite of addition is subtraction, so we subtract 5/8 from both sides.

  10. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1433464376460:dw|

  11. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Ok, as you see, we already moved the 5/8 to the right side. Now we want the 4x on the left side.

  12. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    To do that, we subtract 4x from both sides.

  13. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1433464587100:dw|

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok... I get it

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    kind of

  16. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    We subtracted 4x from both sides. We are close to the answer. We have just a number on the right side, which is good. We have all terms with x on the left side. Now we need to combine both terms with x on the left side. Since we are dealing with fractions, we need to write 4x as a fraction.

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    4/1

  18. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Any whole number can be written as a fraction by simply writing the number over 1. For example, 5 = 5/1; x = x/1; 8 = 8/1

  19. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Good.

  20. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1433464750480:dw|

  21. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    To add or subtract fractions, we need a common denominator. We need the LCD (lowest common denominator) between 4 and 1. The LCD of 4 and 1 is 4. The LCD is the smallest number that is divisible by both numbers.

  22. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1433464906174:dw|

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    omg the library closes in 4 minutes, do you think we could speed this up? Sorry to sound like a pain, believe me I appreciate any help that I get.

  24. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Since we need the fraction 4/1 to have a denominator of 4, and its denominator is now 1, we need to multiply the denominator by 4. That means we need to multiply the numerator also by 4. 4 * 4 = 16, so we get 16/4.

  25. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Yes, almost done. I'll go quickly. You can review it later.

  26. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    We subtract the fractions on the left side. |dw:1433465019576:dw|

  27. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Since x is being multiplied by -13/4, we multiply both sides by its reciprocal: -4/13 |dw:1433465084258:dw|

  28. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    The left side is only x. We multiplty the fractions on the right side and reduce.

  29. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1433465145822:dw|

  30. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Ok, gtg. Bye.

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    -5/26?

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    nvm i see your answer! Thank you soo much!

  33. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    No, it's positive 5/26 since both fractions on the right side are negative, and negative times negative is positive.

  34. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    You're welcome.

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