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anonymous

  • one year ago

Prove that the two circles shown below are similar

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    http://learn.flvs.net/webdav/assessment_images/educator_geometry/v15/module09/09_08_9.jpg

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @is3535

  3. imqwerty
    • one year ago
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    cookie error comes when i open the link

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    SAME WITH ME.

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    humm okay one sec let me screen shot the image and post it :p

  6. is3535
    • one year ago
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    me to

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    1 Attachment
  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    there u go let me know if that works

  9. imqwerty
    • one year ago
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    yes it works

  10. is3535
    • one year ago
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    no ther no simliar B is 5 and D 7 i say

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay can yall help me? this is what i have so far.. idk if its right All circles are similar because you can scale one circle to be the same size as another (bigger or smaller) circle. They effectively have the same shape.

  12. is3535
    • one year ago
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    im not 1000 % that i said

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    humm... i dont think that is right haha

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    you can go from one figure to the other with a translation and a dilation, does that make them similar? im not so sure...

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what if i say this?? Theorem: Any two circles are similar. Proof: Given a circle of radius r and a second circle of radius R , perform a translation so that their centers coincide. A dilation from the common center of the circles with scale factor R takes the points of one circle and maps them onto the second. Thus we have mapped one circle onto the other via a translation and a dilation. The circles are simila

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    First circle with center (-1,5) and radius=4 second circle with center (7,4) and radius =2

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @CayleeS23 ... where did you get that theorem from?

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Their similar because

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    http://www.jamestanton.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Curriculum-Newsletter_January-2013.pdf

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    hello???

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    looks like they are similar, and the proof would be what @CayleeS23 posted before...

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    im confused...

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    listen

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    very simple

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    their both round and they both have no sides

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    proved

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    feel free to fan and medal me

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no that doesnt prove anything haha get otta here dude...

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i guess a better proof would be taking the ratio of their perimeter to their radius for each of them, you will get the same in both cases, actually you get: \[2\pi\] for any circle so they are similar

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I tried. I failed/

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    hey sometimes the answer is easier than you think

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ohh okay that makes since so should i just put that?? proof would be taking the ratio of their perimeter to their radius for each of them, you will get the same in both cases, actually you get: 2π for any circle so they are similar

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can u show me how u did that math? to prove that they are both 2pi

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    this is pi|dw:1433531216624:dw|

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    if you look for the definition of similarity you find somethng like this: "Two figures that have the same shape are said to be similar.When two figures are similar, the ratios of the lengths of their corresponding sides are equal." Applied to a rectangle you would use the ratio between the sides, because that is what defines the rectangle shape, for a circle, the important quantity is its radius

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Gunboss that is exactly what i was saying...

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    :D

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    hum okay... @Gunboss pi means 3.14 in math terms you are thinking of pie like food haha

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I guess. (btw my pi is better)

  40. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    Given a circle of radius r and a second circle of radius R , perform a translation so that their centers coincide. A dilation from the common center of the circles with scale factor k=R/r takes the points of one circle and maps them onto the second. Thus we have mapped one circle onto the other via a translation and a dilation. The circles are similar.

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