anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 2.2. Complete the syllogism. If the time is between 8:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m., then the bank is open. If the bank is open, then people may make withdrawals or deposits. Therefore, if … (Points : 1)
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Vocaloid
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
general form of a syllogism: if A then B if B then C final form: if A then C
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok I am very confuse so sorry

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
ohh ic now so it is a
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
here's an example: If it is hot I will buy ice cream If I buy ice cream I will buy a cookie To complete the syllogism: "If it is hot I will buy a cookie."
anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 2.2. Which completes the syllogism? If the time is between 9:00 AM and 5:00 PM, then the post office is open. If the post office is open, then people may buy stamps or mail packages. Therefore, if … (Points : 1) people may buy stamps or mail packages, then they can also send express mail too. the post office is open, then it is Friday. the time is between 9:00 AM and 5:00 PM, then many people are likely at work and unable buy stamps or mail packages. the time is between 9:00 AM and 5:00 PM, then people may buy stamps or mail packages.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think it is d
anonymous
  • anonymous
is this correct?
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
correct! good job
anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 3.3. Which completes the syllogism? If today is cold, then I will go sledding ______________________________. Therefore, if today is cold, then I will wear a wool hat. (Points : 1) If I go sledding, then I will wear mittens. If I go sledding, then I will wear a wool hat. If today is cold, then it must be snowing. If I wear a wool hat, then today is cold.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think it is b
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
good job~
anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 4.4. Complete the syllogism. If a triangle is a right triangle, then it has one right angle. If a triangle has one right angle, then the sum of the measures of the other two angles is 90 degrees. Therefore, if … (Points : 1) the sum of the measures of two angles is 90, then the angles are complementary. a triangle is a right triangle, then the sum of the measures of the other two angles is 90 degrees. a triangle has one right angle, then the longest side is the hypotenuse. a triangle is a right triangle, then it is not equilateral.
anonymous
  • anonymous
also b?
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
yup!
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok the last one then I need help on another subj in math
anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 5.5. Determine which argument is valid. (Points : 1) If an animal can fly, then it has wings. If an animal is an eagle, then it has wings. If an animal can fly, then it is an eagle. If a triangle is scalene, it has 3 sides of different lengths. If a triangle has 3 sides with different lengths, the triangle has 3 angles of different measures. If a triangle is scalene, the triangle has 3 angles of different measures. If it is a tree, then it has roots. If it has leaves, then it is a plant. If it is a tree, then it has roots and leaves. If a number is divisible by 4, then it is divisible by 2. If a number is divisible by 6, then it is divisible by 2. If a number is divisible by 4, then it is divisible by 6.
anonymous
  • anonymous
B?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Vocaloid
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
yup! good job
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok do u mind helping me wit a mother subj in math
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Vocaloid
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
sure
anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 1.1. State whether the following is an example of inductive reasoning or deductive reasoning. You have a summer job as a mechanic’s helper. The mechanic asks you loosen the lug nuts and remove the wheels of a car. On the first wheel, you notice that the five lug nuts loosen when you turn them counterclockwise. You assume the remaining lug nuts will loosen in the same counterclockwise manner. (Points : 1) Inductive reasoning Deductive reasoning
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think inductive
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Vocaloid
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
yes, good job
anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 2.2. Is the following an example of inductive reasoning or deductive reasoning? For the last five days in a row, you went into a local store and bought a bottle of orange juice. The owner of the store charged you $1.39. When you go into the store today to buy a bottle of orange juice, you expect to pay $1.39. (Points : 1)
anonymous
  • anonymous
deductive?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Vocaloid
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
Hm, not quite Remember, inductive reasoning uses specific examples to arrive at a general conclusion
anonymous
  • anonymous
3. Is the following an example of inductive reasoning or deductive reasoning? The local meteorologist predicts heavy rain in the afternoon. Instead of planning to walk to your friend’s house after band practice, you arrange for your mother to give you a ride there and to pick you up. (Points : 1)
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Vocaloid
anonymous
  • anonymous
deductive
anonymous
  • anonymous
yea u told me that I was not correct on problem 2 what about 3
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
yes, you're right on question 3
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 4.4. Use inductive reasoning to find the next term in the sequence 1, 2, 4, 7, 11…
anonymous
  • anonymous
15 16 13 14
anonymous
  • anonymous
i think 16
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Vocaloid
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
excellent! good job
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok one more then can you help me with one last subj in math?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 5.5. Use inductive reasoning to find the next term in the sequence 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 … What is the next term? (Points : 1)
anonymous
  • anonymous
12 9 13 10
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think it is 8
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
hm, not quite, what do you think the pattern is?
anonymous
  • anonymous
srry 9?
anonymous
  • anonymous
thats what I meant to type and typed it wrong
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
not quite, here's a hint: each number is the sum of the previous two numbers
anonymous
  • anonymous
ohhhh 13 can you pls help me with one more subj in math then I promise to get out of your hair
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
sure
anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
I actually have 2 more subj sorry I feel bad
anonymous
  • anonymous
mutiplycation
anonymous
  • anonymous
property of equality
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
actually, it should be "given" since you don't have proof for it yet
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
this one is the multiplication equality one
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
yup good job
anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
distributive property?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Vocaloid
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
hm, not quite the only thing that changes is the location of the parentheses
anonymous
  • anonymous
associative?
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
yup! good job
anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
i think symmetric
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
not quite, symmetric only applies when both sides are the same hint: which property states that a number multiplied by 1 gives the same number?
anonymous
  • anonymous
identity
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Vocaloid
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
yup! good job
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok next subj in math last one i swear
anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 1.1. Which is a counterexample that disproves the conjecture? For all real numbers n, 2n ≥ 1. (Points : 1) n = –1 n = 0.5 n = 3 n = 0
anonymous
  • anonymous
2^n>1 -
anonymous
  • anonymous
i think -1
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Vocaloid
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
yup good job
anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 2.2. Choose the counterexample that disproves each conjecture. If n is a prime number, then n2 has a 1, 5, or 9 in the ones place. (Points : 1) n = 31 n = 2 n = 17 n = 3
anonymous
  • anonymous
17?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Vocaloid
anonymous
  • anonymous
is that right?
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
yup! sorry it took so long,
anonymous
  • anonymous
naw it is ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 3.3. Which is a counterexample that disproves the conjecture? A student concludes that if x is a real number, then x ≥ x^3. (Points : 1)
anonymous
  • anonymous
x = 1 x = –1 x = 3 x = 0
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think 3
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Vocaloid
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
nope, try plugging in each number and tell me which one disproves the statement
anonymous
  • anonymous
ohh so one
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
nope, keep trying x is greater than x^3, when...?
anonymous
  • anonymous
-1?
anonymous
  • anonymous
none of these work
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Vocaloid
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
actually, yea, you're right, none of the answer choices work... hm...
anonymous
  • anonymous
eh one problem wont hurt
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
actually, your original answer was right, x =3
anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 4.4. Which is a counterexample that disproves the conjecture? A student concludes that if x is a real number, then x ≤ x3. (Points : 1) -1/2 0 -2 1
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think -1/2
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
yup good job
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
and x = 3 for the other one we just did
anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 5.5. Which is a counterexample that disproves the conjecture? After completing several multiplication problems, a student concludes that the product of two binomials is always a trinomial. (Points : 1) (x+7)(x-7) (x+3)(x-3) (x-5)(x-5) (x-1) (x+5)
anonymous
  • anonymous
i think a
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
yes, good job
anonymous
  • anonymous
nope got a 40% on this
anonymous
  • anonymous
I can take it again
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Vocaloid
anonymous
  • anonymous
actually 2 more times
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
um, maybe you can find someone else? maybe my understanding of the problems is wrong D:
anonymous
  • anonymous
kk thx for the rest for the help anyways
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Hauntedwoodsgal
anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 1.1. Which is a counterexample that disproves the conjecture? For all real numbers n, |n| > 0. (Points : 1) n = 3 n = 0.5 n = –0.5 n = 0
anonymous
  • anonymous
i think 3
Hauntedwoodsgal
  • Hauntedwoodsgal
Hello how may I serve you?
anonymous
  • anonymous
lol that question can u tell me if I am correct and do the same for the next 4 problems
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Hauntedwoodsgal
Hauntedwoodsgal
  • Hauntedwoodsgal
yes
Hauntedwoodsgal
  • Hauntedwoodsgal
trying to figure this out ;)
anonymous
  • anonymous
kk :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
do u know how to do?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Hauntedwoodsgal
Hauntedwoodsgal
  • Hauntedwoodsgal
|dw:1433568105963:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
wait what??
anonymous
  • anonymous
this problem
anonymous
  • anonymous
Question 1.1. Which is a counterexample that disproves the conjecture? For all real numbers n, |n| > 0. (Points : 1) n = 3 n = 0.5 n = –0.5 n = 0
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Hauntedwoodsgal Question 1.1. Which is a counterexample that disproves the conjecture? For all real numbers n, |n| > 0. (Points : 1) n = 3 n = 0.5 n = –0.5 n = 0
Hauntedwoodsgal
  • Hauntedwoodsgal
|dw:1433568209100:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
yea but that is not the question lol
anonymous
  • anonymous
this one Question 1.1. Which is a counterexample that disproves the conjecture? For all real numbers n, |n| > 0. (Points : 1) n = 3 n = 0.5 n = –0.5 n = 0
anonymous
  • anonymous
sorry
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Hauntedwoodsgal
Hauntedwoodsgal
  • Hauntedwoodsgal
oh dang
anonymous
  • anonymous
lol it is ok do u know how to do it?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@pooja195 do u

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.