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Destinyyyy

  • one year ago

Graph the following region-- 2x-5y>=0

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ignoring the idea of regions, would you know how to graph 2x-5y = 0 as a line?

  2. Destinyyyy
    • one year ago
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    No.. I could if zero was another number. I have no examples for this kind of problem

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The fact that the other number is 0 actually just means that you have a y-intersect of 0. Are you familiar with slope-intercept form?

  4. Destinyyyy
    • one year ago
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    Yes

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Alright. So if I were to put your inequality into slope-intercept form I would have: \(2x - 5y \ge\ 0\) \(2x \ge\ 5y\) \(\frac{2}{5}x \ge\ y\) So that it maybe looks in a better order, let's rewrite this as \(y \le\ \frac{2}{5}x\) Now, you know slope-intercept form is \(y = mx+b\) where m is the slope and b is the y-intercept. So here we have a slope of 2/5, but no value for b. This means that the y-intercept is 0. So with that information, we can graph this line. Would you be able to graph it given the info above?

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Graph just the line I mean, don't worry about the region part yet.

  7. Destinyyyy
    • one year ago
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    Yes?

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Just making sure :) Well, if we start from the y-intercept of 0 and use a slope of 2/5, we can get this line: |dw:1433634764962:dw| So how the line is drawn makes sense?

  9. Destinyyyy
    • one year ago
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    Yes!

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay, so now the region part. So when the inequality says \(y \le\ \frac{2}{5}x\), it's saying that the correct y-values must be less than or equal to the line. As in the region we want are all the y-values on the line and under the line, meaning we would have this: |dw:1433634956029:dw| So basically, once you put a line into slope-intercept form, if you have \(y \le\) , you're graphing everything under the line and if you have \(y \ge\), you're graphing everything above the line.

  11. Destinyyyy
    • one year ago
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    Okay. Thank you!

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You're welcome

  13. Destinyyyy
    • one year ago
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    Im removing the metal. The answer you gave me was incorrect. @Concentrationalizing

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I dont see how. This is the plot of the graph http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=2x-5y+%3E%3D0 @Destinyyyy

  15. Destinyyyy
    • one year ago
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    This is what the question says is the answer

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The correct answer is how I graphed it above. The slope is 2/5, so every point is up 2 and right 5 from the previous point. The way you graphed the line in the screenshot is with a slope of 5/2. But I gave the correct graph.

  17. Destinyyyy
    • one year ago
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    The first graph is the correct answer the second is my answer (what you gave me).

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Right, and that first graph is what I gave you. I'm not sure where you're seeing that my graph is the graph on the right of your screenshot. |dw:1433636211206:dw| Those are the points on my graph and the points on the graph marked as correct on your screenshot.

  19. Destinyyyy
    • one year ago
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    My apologies I wrote it on my paper wrong.

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I see. I don't mind being wrong and corrected when I am wrong, but as long as you get the correct answer and understand it, then that's what matters. Sorry if there was any confusion.

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