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anonymous

  • one year ago

please help i will reward 2 medals

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What do you need help with?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok A line passes through (3, 7) and (6, 9). Which equation best represents the line? y = 3 over 2x + 5 y = 2 over 3x + 5 y = 3x + 2 y = 2 over 3x + 2

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Abhisar

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Did you try substituting the points in the equations?

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    but i dont get how to do that

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Alright, I'll explain.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thanks btw

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so @ShizukaTheOtaku

  10. TheRaggedyDoctor
    • one year ago
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    You can't give out two medals, btw..

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes i can

  12. TheRaggedyDoctor
    • one year ago
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    No you can't.

  13. TheRaggedyDoctor
    • one year ago
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    You can only give out one.

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i can start a new convo with nothing

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'll do the first for you. So 3 is the x value, and 7 is the y. y = 3/ (2x + 5) which is (7) = 3/ (2(3) +5) So as you can see we are basically substituting the numbers in the place of x and y. And to solve... 7 = 3 /11 We do the same for the other coordinate (6,9) 9 = 3 (2(6) + 5) 9 = 51 They aren't the same. Both sides of the equation must be equal.

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Those two points aren't on the same line.

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok so its b? if i am understanding @ShizukaTheOtaku

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Right @ShizukaTheOtaku ??

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    How did you get that answer?

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i did what you said and i got b

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i am guessing it is wrong

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    By over do you mean 3 / (2x + 5) ?

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yea

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Actually I'm completely stumped now because the rule I know doesn't seem to apply here. Maybe you can tag someone else who knows? Sorry for not being able to help.

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    np u tried

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @mathmath333

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @mathmate

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @imqwerty

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @samanthagreer

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    A line passes through (3, 7) and (6, 9). Which equation best represents the line? y = 3 over 2x + 5 y = 2 over 3x + 5 y = 3x + 2 y = 2 over 3x + 2

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    over means /

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so no one knows what to do?

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so no one knows what to do?

  34. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    the way you have written the equations is a little confusing- for example the first one|dw:1433686178817:dw| which of the following is correct:-

  35. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    oh - hold on - it must be the first because the graph is a line sorry

  36. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    i can see which one it is you just need to plug in the points and see which equation fits

  37. imqwerty
    • one year ago
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    (y-y1)/(y2-y1) = (x-x1)/(x2-x1) (y-7)/(9-7)=(x-3)/(6-3) (y-7)/2=(x-3)/3 3y-21=2x-6 3y=2x+15 y=(2/3)x+5

  38. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    - the other way to do it is as imqwery has just done. he has derived the equation using the given points and used the general formula for a line given the coordinates of 2 points

  39. phi
    • one year ago
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    which problem are you working on ?

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