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anonymous

  • one year ago

Can someone explain to me how to relate a vertical line test to understanding functions?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sure, what do you not understand though?

  2. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    just draw vertical lines if graph of the function hit the vertical lien more than one spot then that graph doesn't represent a function ???q

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm not sure how to explain it really. Doesn't the line have to go through a function, like a U shape, or something like that? I just need a better way of understanding it.

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Imagine a graph, that has a equation that looks like a U when graphed. This equation would be a function. If the equation when graphed looked like a Z it would not pass the vertical line test.

  5. ybarrap
    • one year ago
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    See my answer to a similar question earlier today - http://openstudy.com/users/ybarrap#/updates/5574cbc8e4b01d0053ac2507

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    This is because you have two \(x\) values.

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    *multiple

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So it cant pass through two lines, right? Ok, thank you!

  9. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1433726425861:dw| like this and ofc not a perfect graph lel :P:P

  10. ybarrap
    • one year ago
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    It can't pass through two POINTS.

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay so tell me does this graph pass the vertical line test, and is it a function: \[f\left(x\right)\ =\ 5x^2\ +\ 2\] You can use: https://www.desmos.com/calculator to graph.

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i get it.

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    All right, just wanted to make sure.

  14. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    vertical line means no slope

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can you explain the inputs & outputs when graphing a function? I never got it.

  16. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    true you don't have a function if you have more than one output for a given input

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    By inputs, and outputs when graphing a function do you mean something like this: \[f(x) = 5x + 1\] \[f(5) = 5x + 1 \rightarrow f(5) = 5(5) + 1 = 26\] So a point you would graph would be \((5, 26)\). Basically you keep feeding in \(x\) values to get \(y\) values to graph you equation. (The line would go through the points, you plot down.)

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    How would I go about something like this? 'Determine if the outside temperature is a function of the time of day or if the time of day is a function of temperature'

  19. ybarrap
    • one year ago
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    The question about temperature and time is is about identifying the independent variable. The independent variable is not a function of anything. The thing measured, in this case, temperature, is a function of time. So here time would be the x-axis and temperature would be the y-axis. You give me the time, I give you a unique temperature. The other way around, if I give you a temperature, there could be multiple times of day where the temperature could be that value. So temperature could NOT be a function for that reason. Usually you want to know what the temperature will be at a certain time of day;. This is another way you know that temperature is a function of time.

  20. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    a simple question "which variable is controlled?" the controlled variable is the independent variable. The one that varies is the output, the dependent variable.

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thank you, @ybarrap

  22. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1433731436123:dw|

  23. ybarrap
    • one year ago
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    You're welcome @Kitt020912 .

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