shadow13
  • shadow13
Read these lines from William Blake’s “A Poison Tree”: I was angry with my friend: I told my wrath, my wrath did end. These lines, and the entire poem, use the __________. third-person limited point of view third-person omniscient point of view first-person point of view second-person point of view
English
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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shadow13
  • shadow13
@readergirl12
anonymous
  • anonymous
it is first person
readergirl12
  • readergirl12
I agree .cx

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shadow13
  • shadow13
ok
shadow13
  • shadow13
Shakespeare uses many __________, comparisons that do not include words such as like and as, in “All the World’s a Stage.” metaphors symbols similes foreshadowings
shadow13
  • shadow13
i think it is c
readergirl12
  • readergirl12
It's metaphors.. x3
shadow13
  • shadow13
ok why is that?
anonymous
  • anonymous
a metaphor dosn't use the comparison like or as for ex. he is swifter than a fox
shadow13
  • shadow13
he images in much of Langston Hughes’s poem “Harlem [2]” bring to mind things that are __________. renewed and hopeful beautiful and graceful rotten and decaying innovative and exciting i think it is B
shadow13
  • shadow13
o got it is C
shadow13
  • shadow13
How does the final line of "Harlem [2]" change the mood of the poem? It suggests something happier and more hopeful. It suggests something sadder and drearier. It suggests something violent and more dangerous. It suggests something foolish and comical. this is one i am having a big problem with i think it is a but c also sounds good for this to
shadow13
  • shadow13
@soulevans
anonymous
  • anonymous
do you have the line
shadow13
  • shadow13
no it doesn't show
shadow13
  • shadow13
@soulevans
anonymous
  • anonymous
hold on
shadow13
  • shadow13
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
alright i found the line online and it suggests something dangerous and violent
shadow13
  • shadow13
so like c mostlikely
anonymous
  • anonymous
yeah
shadow13
  • shadow13
thanks man
anonymous
  • anonymous
your welcome

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