anonymous
  • anonymous
Medal goes to whoever helps
Mathematics
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
What is the question?
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
dont know
anonymous
  • anonymous
gen are you good at economics?

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anonymous
  • anonymous
oops sorry i totally forgot
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anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
I alson need help with this one
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GenTorr
  • GenTorr
what???
anonymous
  • anonymous
what do you mean lol cause i tagged you?
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
noo didn't see the document you sent
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
lol
anonymous
  • anonymous
which one the first?
anonymous
  • anonymous
can you see it know?
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GenTorr
  • GenTorr
yes i can
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
i would say 90
anonymous
  • anonymous
hmm how did you get that if you don't mind me asking?
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
sure
anonymous
  • anonymous
Its 90 degrees.
mathmate
  • mathmate
Hint: PQ makes 60\(^\circ\) with the horizontal, while RS is parallel to the horizontal.
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
okay i got 90 because it said that the center of O to pqrf makes 90 degrees |dw:1433889605766:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh,Thanks can you help me with a couple more please?
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GenTorr
  • GenTorr
sure
anonymous
  • anonymous
Wait it would be 300 degrees
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
how??
anonymous
  • anonymous
@mathmate Thats what my teacher told me, but i didn't get it...
anonymous
  • anonymous
Because It would only take 60 degrees to make PQ Line up to RF or 300 degrees to make it happen
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
unless you go from f to n clock wise
mathmate
  • mathmate
We are mapping PQ to RF, so P->R, and Q->F so far so good? Think of mapping OP-> OR What is the angle needed (CCW)
anonymous
  • anonymous
umm you've lost me... is it 60
mathmate
  • mathmate
In the Cartesian plane, all angles are counter-clockwise.
mathmate
  • mathmate
|dw:1433889923664:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
i see that, can you kind of tell me what the translation rule is?
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
exsactly that's what i was trying to say
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
f to n = 300
mathmate
  • mathmate
I would put it as \(R_{O,300}\) a rotation about O of 300 degrees (understood to be CCW)
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
true im kindergarten style lol
anonymous
  • anonymous
Can you help me with one last question?
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mathmate
  • mathmate
@GenTorr Would you be able to work out the second problem with @MacBabe ?
mathmate
  • mathmate
BTW, the first problem is a rotation, not translation.
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
sure
mathmate
  • mathmate
Thank you!
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
i was looking at it right now
anonymous
  • anonymous
I know that but i was confused about the translation rule, my teacher was trying to explain it to me and i just... yea
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
yup i was confused too
anonymous
  • anonymous
can you help? or you don't get it
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
i can help im just figuring it out
anonymous
  • anonymous
@GenTorr did you give Mathmate a medal? Thanks if you did cause i also wanted to give him or her a medal but you can only give one
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
yup i did
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
wow this is hard to understand O_O
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yea it was hard for me too but if you can't help thanks anway c:
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
yup
anonymous
  • anonymous
alright thanks anyway
anonymous
  • anonymous
i'll just open a new post and hope for the best
anonymous
  • anonymous
Im not sure about it either sorry. Maybe ask @mathmate.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@brandonford7 thanks anyway c:
mathmate
  • mathmate
@MacBabe any ideas?
mathmate
  • mathmate
Can you start by describing the question in your own words?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Um no cause TBH these problems confuse the heck out of me but i can try. I think the question is to find the matching translation?
mathmate
  • mathmate
I'll start: A point P is transformed to P' through a glide reflection. A glide reflection is a translation T, followed by a reflection S. P' is given (-8,-3), but P is the point we'd like to find. Can you continue by reading through the question and plugging in numbers for the reflection and the translation?
anonymous
  • anonymous
wait is it c?
mathmate
  • mathmate
I don't look at answers before I have mine, sorry... unless you can explain to me how you got it.
anonymous
  • anonymous
(-2, -3) i honestly just guessed, so i just have to plug in each answer to (x,y)->(x,y-5).. (x,y) would be (-8,3) right? so (-8,3) -> (x,y-5) i have to feel it in with the numbers that are the answers? See o know i'm wrong its just confusing to me
mathmate
  • mathmate
|dw:1433892913007:dw|
mathmate
  • mathmate
|dw:1433893125603:dw|
mathmate
  • mathmate
The transformation is done by reflecting P across the line x=-5 to Q. After that, the translation (x,y)->(x, y-5) brings Q to P'(-8,3).
mathmate
  • mathmate
Are you foollowing so far? See if you can figure out what the coordinates of P(x,y) are.
anonymous
  • anonymous
yea i am
mathmate
  • mathmate
So starting with P(x,y), what would be the coordinates of Q, knowing that there is a reflection about x=-5 ?
mathmate
  • mathmate
Perhaps it's easier to work backwards. We know that a translation of (x,y)->(x,y-5) brings Q to P'. So what translation will bring P' to Q?
anonymous
  • anonymous
(-8,2) or was it (8,3) Geometry is my worst subject i'm barley passing with a C, sorry if i'm not doing any good theres just to many math terms that don't make since to me. I think its one of those
mathmate
  • mathmate
The inverse transformation of the translation (x,y)->(x,y-5) is (x,y)->(x,y+5). So yes, (-8,-3) ->(-8,-3+5) or Q(-8,+2)
mathmate
  • mathmate
Now the reflection about x=-5 is (x,y) -> (-5-(x-(-5)),y), or \(\color{red}{(x,y)-> (-10-x, ~~y)}\) and the inverse of a reflection is the reflection itself. Can you now find P as the reflection of Q about x=-5 ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
wait but what would be y? or is y suppose to be p or something?
mathmate
  • mathmate
y->y means no change x->-10-x means x undergoes a reflection about x=-5. Recall we are transforming from Q to P.
anonymous
  • anonymous
wait x y -3 - - x y - 5 so is the answer (-8,2) (me attempting to get this)
anonymous
  • anonymous
@mathmate that must not be the answer than...
mathmate
  • mathmate
(-8, 2) is the correct answer for Q (the intermediate step). You'd still do the reflection from Q to P to get the final answer.
mathmate
  • mathmate
Just to refresh the memory! |dw:1433896416150:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
-8,-8?
mathmate
  • mathmate
the reflection about x=-5 is i(x,y)−>(−10−x, y)
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok.
mathmate
  • mathmate
Start with Q(-8,2) and apply reflection!
anonymous
  • anonymous
I ended up turning it in with the answer -2, -3 it was possibly wrong, i just couldn't get it. you had a lot of patients with me so thanks for that c:
mathmate
  • mathmate
Well, didn't we establish that Q(-8,-2) ?
mathmate
  • mathmate
that was after the translation, and before the reflection, right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes.
mathmate
  • mathmate
To do the reflection Q->P, we apply the rule: Q(-8,2) -> P(-10-(-8), 2) after we simplified -10-(-8)=-10+8=-2, so P(-2,2) and that's your answer.
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh, well thanks anyway.
mathmate
  • mathmate
Once you understand how the rules are used, the transformations are easy. It may be harder to figure out the rules, but with time, you'll master it.
anonymous
  • anonymous
yea i hope

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