anonymous
  • anonymous
perfect square?
Mathematics
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
@geerky42 do you know about perfect squares, sorry to bother you
anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm pretty sure that to create a perfect square trinomial you divide the middle term by 2, square it, and then add it to the expression so it is the 3rd term

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anonymous
  • anonymous
@RiOT so to square 4w it would be 4w^2
anonymous
  • anonymous
what about this did i do this right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
sorry, just the coefficent, so it would be 4^2
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh but why just the coefficient
anonymous
  • anonymous
have you learned about completing the square?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yeah sorry that was a stupid question my bad
anonymous
  • anonymous
are you in algebra 2? i'm doing it right now and so I could be wrong but I believe that's what this is
anonymous
  • anonymous
no, no problem
anonymous
  • anonymous
@RiOT did i do the second one right
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm doing a college math but like sometimes when you just put the coefficient i get it wrong
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm sorry, I'm not sure about the second one
anonymous
  • anonymous
hmm well i got 3.35078106, or 0.14921894
anonymous
  • anonymous
so i have to round to the nearest hundredth
anonymous
  • anonymous
so wouldn't it be 4.3
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm just not 100% sure how to solve that problem. I'm sorry :/
anonymous
  • anonymous
@geerky42 any input
anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
@peachpi any input on my second question
geerky42
  • geerky42
Check again. There is more than one solution.
anonymous
  • anonymous
yeah 3.35078106, and 0.14921894
anonymous
  • anonymous
so you're saying i show go for 0.14921894 @geerky42
anonymous
  • anonymous
@geerky42 then wouldn't it be 1.1 by rounding to the nearest hundredth
anonymous
  • anonymous
or 1.14
geerky42
  • geerky42
Yes that one, but that's not how you rounding.
geerky42
  • geerky42
You just rounding to nearest hundredth For example: |dw:1433958363553:dw|
geerky42
  • geerky42
Which is \(0.15\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
ah i see sorry well one more check please i believe it's correct @geerky42
geerky42
  • geerky42
It's ok and you are correct.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok thanks and hey i remember you telling me something about the local minimum and maxima but just to double check man sorry @geerky42
anonymous
  • anonymous
geerky42
  • geerky42
|dw:1433959525927:dw|
geerky42
  • geerky42
|dw:1433959551853:dw|
geerky42
  • geerky42
So local minimums are|dw:1433959575568:dw| here, right?
geerky42
  • geerky42
So for first answer, you need x-values where local minimums occur.
anonymous
  • anonymous
so -2,-3 @geerky42
anonymous
  • anonymous
-2 would be the x value
geerky42
  • geerky42
Close. It's -2 and 3.
anonymous
  • anonymous
but how is it positive 3
anonymous
  • anonymous
and I'm assuming the second answer is ok
geerky42
  • geerky42
|dw:1433959794678:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
and i got it so what about this
geerky42
  • geerky42
Second answer isn't 3,3. Same as last time, but y-values instead.
anonymous
  • anonymous
wait but last time i had this right dammit this is confusing
geerky42
  • geerky42
Seen in picture, you entered 0, 3 for second part.
geerky42
  • geerky42
I believe it should be -3, 0
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok for the first one its not 3,3 it -2,3 because the x values where the local minimums occur so for the y values -3,0
anonymous
  • anonymous
geerky42
  • geerky42
\(\color{blue}{\text{Originally Posted by}}\) @Mromanos96 ok for the first one its not 3,3 it -2,3 because the x values where the local minimums occur so for the y values -3,0 \(\color{blue}{\text{End of Quote}}\) That's correct.
anonymous
  • anonymous
i believe that is correct
geerky42
  • geerky42
yeah this is correct.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ah ok thanks @geerky42
anonymous
  • anonymous
srry i just like to go over all my test answers before submitting them man
geerky42
  • geerky42
you also are correct about \((x-4)^2\) part.
anonymous
  • anonymous
thanks i think i have the rest right ill make another thread if i need help man
geerky42
  • geerky42
OK no problem

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