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anonymous

  • one year ago

In a lab experiment, a 0.6-g peanut is burned beneath 60 g of water. Heat from the burning peanut raises the water temperature from 22⁰C to 50⁰C in 3.0 minutes. If the heat transfer is 41% efficient, how many Calories of heat did the peanut release while burning? Show all calculations leading to an answer.

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Abhisar

  2. Sachintha
    • one year ago
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    I think this is more probably suitable for physics section.

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    theres a physics section?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    this is definitly physics

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    you can use the specific heat equation, I'm just not sure where the time comes in

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    idk either

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I really don't think it comes into play because it's asking about energy, not power. It just might be a number thrown in there.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    im gonna re enter this in physics

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    because you don't need the mass of the peanut either

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so what do you think i should do @peachpi

  11. Sachintha
    • one year ago
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    I hope this would be answered in the physics section. Good luck! :)

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no one is online to help apparently @Sachintha

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Find the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of the water \[Q = mC(T _{f}-T _{i})\] \[Q = (60~g)(1~cal/g°C)(50°C-22°C)\] \[Q = 1,680~cal\] This is 41% of the heat released by the peanut. \[0.41x=1680\] \[x=4,098~cal\]

  14. Sachintha
    • one year ago
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    Exactly what I said. Anyway are you sure about the answer? @peachpi I didn't knew the specific heat capacity of water in calories (knew only in joules) since I didn't know the definition of a calorie. :D

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes because if you work it with C in J/g°C then convert to calories at the end you get the same answer

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