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anonymous

  • one year ago

The table shows the results of rolling a number cube, with sides labeled 1 through 6, several times. What is the experimental probability of rolling a 2 or a 4? Express your answer in simplest form. Outcome 1 2 3 4 5 6 Number of times outcome occurred 10 6 4 8 6 6

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @peachpi @Mahmood786123

  2. Mahmood786123
    • one year ago
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    gimme a sec

  3. Mahmood786123
    • one year ago
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    just add all the values up! A 1 was rolled 10 times, a 2 was rolled 6 times...how many "times" were there total?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    im thinking it 2/5

  5. Mahmood786123
    • one year ago
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    94

  6. Mahmood786123
    • one year ago
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    Where's the 94 coming from? I get 40! When you're calculating probability, you want to find how often your outcome of interest occurs out of the total number of outcomes that actually occur. I'm trying to get you to calculate each individually, starting with the total number of outcomes. The number cube was rolled a bunch of times. Each roll is called a trial. The number that was rolled was recorded for each trial performed. In the end, 10 trials rolled a 1, 6 trials rolled a 2, and so on through 6. The total number of trials can be found by adding all the trials that resulted in each outcome, so: 10+6+4+8+6+6=40 There were 40 trials/rolls in total. Of those 40 rolls, we want to know how often a 3 or a 6 popped up. According to the table, 4 rolls resulted in a 3, and 6 rolls resulted in a 6, so out of the 40 rolls, our outcome of interest (a 3 or a 6) occurred 4+6=10 times. That means the experimental probability (the probability based on this particular experiment) of rolling a 3 or a 6 is 10/40, or 1/4. Does that makes sense?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i need a fraction

  8. Mahmood786123
    • one year ago
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    It's just a matter of understanding the situation you're given. For these kinds of questions, always try to follow the procedure I explained above!

  9. Mahmood786123
    • one year ago
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    1/4

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thx mahmood

  11. Mahmood786123
    • one year ago
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    your welcome

  12. Mahmood786123
    • one year ago
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    hope I helped :)

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    u think u can help with 5 more

  14. Mahmood786123
    • one year ago
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    i'll try but I might need to leave soon

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok imma close this then reopen

  16. Mahmood786123
    • one year ago
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    ok

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