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anonymous

  • one year ago

Help please!

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Any ideas?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    well I started by changing it to this format \[\frac{ x }{ x+2 } \div \frac{ 1 }{ x } + \frac{ 1 }{ x+2 }\]

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    if there wasn't addition in it I would flip the second equation and change it to multiplication, but I don't know what to do because of the addition.

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes, yes... i see

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Wouldn't the answer be \[\frac{ x^2 }{ 2x+2}\]

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    well, are you able to flip the fraction (1/X) into (X/1) and multiply that to (X/X=2)?

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I don't know, would it?

  9. Rhystic
    • one year ago
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    so really if you divide the fractions on the bottom its the same as reciprocating them to the top.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ye

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm not sure @Da_Homie because it looks more like this\[\frac{ x }{ x+2 } \div (\frac{ 1 }{ x } + \frac{ 1 }{ x+2 })\]

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Well, the way I did it will give you the answer but not actually learning how to do problems like this in the future. But basically I plugged \[\frac{ \frac{ x }{x+2} }{ \frac{ 1 }{ x }+\frac{ 1 }{ x+2 } } \] into my calculator and got 50/11. Then if I plug the rest of the multiple choice answers into my calculator, the only answer to give me 50/11 is C.

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Cant u reciprocate it to (X+X+2/1)? and multiply?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I don't know, that's why I'm asking for help @Da_Homie lol and thank you @lehmad

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What class is this for anyway?

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Algebra 2

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh snap, ur darn near 18 and only taking Algebra 2?

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    U should be in Calc by now at least

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Anyway

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what do you mean only? Algebra 2 is the regular math for my age! I'm only a junior

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I don't know where you're from, but here you start with Algebra in freshman, geometry in sophomore and algebra 2 in junior.

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    We start with Geometry as a freshman :P. And a lot of us double up our maths too

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    well good for you I don't care. don't come into my questions and insult me

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    hahahaha calm down, i didnt mean to insult u. Sorry if i did

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm in the correct math for my age and yes you did insult me.

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok. well... would you prefer i continue to assist you with this problem, or leave?

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Im fine either way, because we're both getting a little worked up here

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I would be fine with you leaving..... 17 = junior = algebra 2 this is how it is where I am from

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    you can tell me I'm ugly and annoying but don't insult my academics.

  30. Rhystic
    • one year ago
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    so your first step just find the least common denomitor for all three fractions. What do you get for this?

  31. Rhystic
    • one year ago
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    Ok @AutumnRoseT To find the LCD the easiest way in this case since you have two denominators that are the same and one different is just multiply the two different denominators together yielding -> x^2+2x or x(x+2) now take that and multiply all of the fractions with it and simplify you should come out with C. |dw:1434040523987:dw|

  32. Rhystic
    • one year ago
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    sorry the drawing is really crude

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I already go the answer @Rhystic

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