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anonymous

  • one year ago

Please help! 1. How many valence electrons are in the outermost energy level of each of the following elements? a. Helium b. Lithium c. Nitrogen d. Magnesium I listed them as letters to make it easier to understand...

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  1. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Do you know how to write electronic configurations?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ?electronic configurations?

  3. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Yes, like for helium (atomic number 2) we write \(\sf 1s^2\)

  4. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    For nitrogen (atomic number 7) we write \(\sf 1s^2 2s^2 2p^3\)

  5. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    any idea?

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    nope... no clue, sorry I am literally so stupid when it comes to all this electron atom stuff.

  7. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Then how will you solve this?

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I am trying to understand it, so let me think out loud here

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    would you solve it like an equation? @Abhisar

  10. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Good, I may teach you a short trick but it may not be always correct but you will just do fine for school level.

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok... I will start with helium. 1s^2. first would you find the square root of 1s?

  12. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    No it's not square (-: It means there are 2 electrons in 1s orbital.

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ohhhk

  14. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Leave it, just remember the sequence 2, 8, 8, 18

  15. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Now, if i say you to write the configuration of nitrogen (atomic no 7). You will write 2, 5 (Why five? because the sum has to be 7)

  16. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Getting?

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok I am following you

  18. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    So, if i say write for lithium (atomic no. 3), how will ya do?

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I would write 1, 2?

  20. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    2, 1

  21. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Remember the series. It's 2, 8, 8, 18

  22. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    ok?

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok I get it

  24. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    For Magnesium (12)

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    8, 4?

  26. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Nopes.

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    6, 6

  28. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    See the series, 2, 8, 8, 18 So will write first 2, now we need 10 more. So next we write 2, 8, now we need 2 more so finally we write 2, 8, 2. Got it now?

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yehh

  30. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Finally write for hydrogen

  31. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    sorry , for helium

  32. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    attomic number is 2

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    wouldnt it just be 2?

  34. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Correct !!!

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so I have the numbers: a. Helium- 2 b. Lithium-2,1 c. Nitrogen-2,5 d. Magnesium-2,8,2

  36. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Well done! Now we know that electronic configurations for the given elements are as following a. Helium = 2 b. Lithium = 2, 1 c. Nitrogen = 2,5 d. Magnesium = 2,8,2 How to calculate valence electron now??? The last number in each of them represents the valence electrons. So for nitrogen, number of valence electrons will be 2.

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    huh?

  38. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Can you tell me the number of valence electrons for the rest?

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    if it's the last number, wait what is that referring to ?

  40. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what placement is it referring to?

  41. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    I am not able to understand ur question..

  42. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what do you mean by "The last number in each of them represents the valence electrons." ^^^^^^^^^^^^

  43. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1434048894292:dw|

  44. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes but you said that 2 was nitrogen's number, but wouldnt it be 5?

  45. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    When did I say that? Yes, nitrogen has 5 valence electrons.

  46. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    XD "The last number in each of them represents the valence electrons. So for nitrogen, number of valence electrons will be 2."

  47. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Last is 5 :( See, what we wrote for Nitrogen. (2, 5). 2 is first and 5 is last. Getting it?

  48. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Oh, sorry that was a typo :D

  49. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I see! so the numbers would be: a. Helium = 2 b. Lithium = 1 c. Nitrogen = 5 d. Magnesium = 2

  50. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    \(\color{blue}{\text{Originally Posted by}}\) @Abhisar Well done! Now we know that electronic configurations for the given elements are as following a. Helium = 2 b. Lithium = 2, 1 c. Nitrogen = 2,5 d. Magnesium = 2,8,2 How to calculate valence electron now??? The last number in each of them represents the valence electrons. So for nitrogen, number of valence electrons will be 5. \(\color{blue}{\text{End of Quote}}\)

  51. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Correct!

  52. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thank you

  53. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    You're welcome (-:

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