anonymous
  • anonymous
how did math affect ancient times
History
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
@foreverthebeast
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
can you help me

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anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
The ancient Greek numeral system, known as Attic or Herodianic numerals, was fully developed by about 450 BC, and in regular use possibly as early as the 7th Century BC. It was a base 10 system similar to the earlier Egyptian one (and even more similar to the later Roman system), with symbols for 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, 500 and 1,000 repeated as many times needed to represent the desired number. Addition was done by totalling separately the symbols (1s, 10s, 100s, etc) in the numbers to be added, and multiplication was a laborious process based on successive doublings (division was based on the inverse of this process). Thales' Intercept Theorem Thales' Intercept Theorem But most of Greek mathematics was based on geometry. Thales, one of the Seven Sages of Ancient Greece, who lived on the Ionian coast of Asian Minor in the first half of the 6th Century BC, is usually considered to have been the first to lay down guidelines for the abstract development of geometry, although what we know of his work (such as on similar and right triangles) now seems quite elementary. Thales established what has become known as Thales' Theorem, whereby if a triangle is drawn within a circle with the long side as a diameter of the circle, then the opposite angle will always be a right angle (as well as some other related properties derived from this). He is also credited with another theorem, also known as Thales' Theorem or the Intercept Theorem, about the ratios of the line segments that are created if two intersecting lines are intercepted by a pair of parallels (and, by extension, the ratios of the sides of similar triangles).
anonymous
  • anonymous
thx
pooja195
  • pooja195
@foreverthebeast dont forget to site your sources. http://www.storyofmathematics.com/greek.html
anonymous
  • anonymous
how u know
pooja195
  • pooja195
I took your paragraph and copied and pasted it into google ._.

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