sierra!
  • sierra!
Television coverage hurt the civil rights movement in Selma. A. Yes B. No
History
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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@Nnesha
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@pooja195

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@mathmate
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GenTorr
  • GenTorr
found this tell me if it help In the 1960s the civil rights marchers calmly and peacefully walked down the streets as they headed toward segregated lunch counters and tried to register to vote. As they walked, some law enforcement officials arrested them on made-up charges. In other places they were attacked by police officers using fists and nightsticks, sprayed with high-pressure water hoses from fire hydrants, and even poked with electric cattle prods. In other places people on the streets would attack them, spit on them and yell epithets at them. People from all over the country could see this on the news on national television and were appalled at the violence. The conflicts made excellent viewing. It was only because of the television, which made the violence much more "real" than reading about it in the newspaper, or even seeing pictures in Life Magazine, that so many people got so upset. That put pressure on Congress to pass the Civil Rights Acts. One thing that made a difference between the North and the South in school desegregation was the differences in the sizes of school districts. For example, Florida has county wide school districts. In Westchester County, New York, the Town of Scarsdale, consisting of almost all white people, has its own school district; and the Town of Mount Vernon, a few miles away and about half black, has its own school district. In Florida, parents objected to having children bussed several miles so that a school would be integrated. New York did not combine school districts in order to integrate the districts and bus the children. Children were not bussed from Mt. Vernon to Scarsdale. In fact, children were not even bussed from the black side of Mt. Vernon to the north side. It was easy for people in the North and West to criticize segregation, but they had it too. The segregation in the South was "de jure", by law. Many places in the North and West were segregated also, but it was "de facto", it existed due to other reasons.
GenTorr
  • GenTorr
i would say yes from reading it but again i dont know
tkhunny
  • tkhunny
Are you serious? It was Television Coverage that gave it value! Hiding from sight was the problem. Exposure made things better.
sierra!
  • sierra!
So the answer is No?
tkhunny
  • tkhunny
Not a necessary question. Please draw your conclusion from the given information. Don't make others draw conclusions for you.

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