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anonymous

  • one year ago

Simplify secθ + secθtan^2θ. A.) 1 B.) cosθ C.) secθ D.) sec^3θ

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  1. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    factor!

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    example please.

  3. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    sec theta = x tan theta = y so you can write it as \[\huge\rm (x+xy^2)\] so what is common in these both terms ?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    x

  5. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    yes right so take it out\[\huge\rm x(1+y^2)\] now you can replace x and y by sec an tan \[\huge\rm sec \theta (1+ \tan^2)\] 1+tan^2 = what ? ^^^^identity

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i still dont understand whatsoever.

  7. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    it's same like simple algebra first we have to find GCF(greatest common factor) \[\huge\rm sec \theta + \sec \theta \tan^2 \] sec is common so take it out and divide both terms by common factor write your answer in the parentheses|dw:1434120062504:dw| \[\sec \theta (1+ tan^2 \theta )\]

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    right now i feel like i must be missing something... because i dont understand what i am susposed to be understanding...

  9. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    alright did you take notes ?

  10. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    tag other users maybe they can explain better than me :-) :-) good luck!!! :-)

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    kk

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @aloud @mathmath333 @mathmate

  13. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    As @Nnesha said, factor: secθ + secθtan^2θ what do you get?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    how do i factor?

  15. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    For example, factoring xy+xz = x(y+z)

  16. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    You take out the common factor from each term. It's like the inverse of distribution.

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    right now, i guess my mind is still waking up. but i think i am starting to understand factoring...

  18. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    Well, hints I give would be: 1. factor out sec\(\theta\) see https://www.mathsisfun.com/algebra/factoring.html for help 2. apply one of the pythagorean trig. identities. see http://www.sosmath.com/trig/Trig5/trig5/trig5.html for help.

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i give up.

  20. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    Practice does not make perfect. Only \(\huge\rm \color{reD}{{Perfect~Practice}}\) makes perfect. ~Vince Lombardi so practice!!

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