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anonymous

  • one year ago

A rectangular barge 7 m long and 2 m wide floats in fresh water. How much will the barge sink when loaded with 600 kg of sand? Show all calculations leading to an answer.

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @sleepyjess @Michele_Laino

  2. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    here we have to apply the Principle of Archimede

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I think the answer is 40mm"

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Water Density = 1,000kg/m^3 600/1,000= .6m^3 Area = 15m^2 V= (L)(W)(D)= .6^3 D= .6m^3/15m^2 = .04m = 40mm"

  5. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    If I call with "h" the sinking level, then we can write: \[\Large LWh\delta g= Mg\] where: L is the length of the barge, W is the width of the barge \delta is the density of water g is gravity M is the mass of the loaded sand

  6. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    is 600 Kg the mass of the sand ot its weight?

  7. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    or*

  8. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    I think that M=600 Kg is the mass of the sand

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yeah i think mass

  10. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    so we get: \[\Large h = \frac{M}{{LW\delta }} = \frac{{600}}{{7 \times 2 \times 1000}} = ...\]

  11. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    what is h?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the depth of sinking?

  13. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    yes!

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    In mine i hade it D

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Made*

  16. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    I got: \[\Large h \cong 43\;mm\]

  17. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    so, you are right!

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yay!

  19. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    :)

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    When a steadily-flowing gas flows from a larger-diameter pipe to a smaller-diameter pipe, what causes the pressure in the smaller pipe to drop? Use 3 – 4 complete sentences to explain your answer.

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    do you know this? lol

  22. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    if we can neglect all loss of energy of the gas, then we can apply the Principle of Bernoulli furtermore we can apply the equation of continuity

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @kaitlynmcurtis Bernoulli's principle states that the same V/s of fluid flowing will remain the same. If the radius of a pipe drops, then then the fluid has to travel faster through the pipe in order to maintain the same Volume per second... the only way the fluid can move faster is if there is a pressure drop from the larger pipe into the smaller pipe. Hope the helps!

  24. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    for example, the equation of continuity is: \[\Large {A_1}{v_1} = {A_2}{v_2}\] |dw:1434221385263:dw| A is the cross sectional area v is the speed of the gas

  25. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    so when the cross sectional area is minimum, then the speed of the gas is maximum

  26. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    I have assumed that the density of our gas doesn't change as we go from section #1 to section #2

  27. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    next the Principle of Bernoulli is: \[\Large gz + \frac{P}{\delta } + \frac{{{v^2}}}{2} = const\] where g is gravity, and z is the geodesic height

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I think I got this one done, could you guys help me with another? @cramos725 @Michele_Laino

  29. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1434221789810:dw|

  30. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    ok!

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